Jan
3
Jan 16

POWER PAINTING

Instructors: Matt Morris and Maddie Reyna

PAINT • 3 credit hours

This studio course will serve as a lively investigation into the ways that painting’s dominance is perpetually reasserted as the marketplace’s favored medium, a holder of significant histories, and as the standard to which other creative enterprises are compared. Co-taught by Matt Morris and Maddie Reyna, student will work on self-directed painting projects supplemented with readings, discussions, and observations into the aesthetics and apparatuses of power that gives shape to painting as a practice. How do we analyze power dynamics in formal and social relationships? How is power made manifest in the material qualities of painting? In this course, artists will be supported in developing personally relevant means of empowerment and will be trained in examining how those powers function.

Jan
3
Jan 16

PLEIN AIRE PROGRAMMING

Instructor: Siebren Versteeg

ART TECH • 3 credit hours

With the ever-increasing ubiquity and miniaturization of digital devices comes the opportunity to reproach traditional means of animation and programming practices. Untethered from the Internet’s distractions as well as the troglodytian catacombs of computer labs, this class takes studied observation of the natural phenomena in and around Ox-Bow’s grounds as its primary source of inspiration and context. Students are introduced to a variety of animation techniques and practices that forego over-rendered articulation in favor of gestural motion studies and are encouraged to produce digital interventions in and around campus throughout the course of the class. A laptop (PC or Mac) will be required; projector encouraged.

Jan
3
Jan 16

SEMINAR: PRESENTATION AND CRITIQUE

Instructors: Sheila Pepe assisted by Danny Giles

FIBER/VCS • 3 credit hours

What happens to the work when it leaves the studio? The goal of this seminar is to investigate accepted methods of display and interpretation used among artists today. An enormous subject in itself, the focus of this course will be found at the intersection of participants’ accumulated individual experiences. Class readings and exercises will amplify that juncture. Topics concerning presentation will include a brief history of museum and gallery display, as well as a discussion of contemporary techniques of exhibition installation. The notion of critique will be opened up by a review of its constituent parts, including observation and description, methods and limits of interpretation, and the use of the personal and studio narrative. We will look at the academic “crit” as both pedagogical device and prototype of public presentation and evaluation. Classes will consist discussion of texts, assignments and presentations. Discussion and presentations will be augmented by focused and self directed studo time.