in | un | data: humanizing data viz
Jun
2
to Jun 15

in | un | data: humanizing data viz

in | un | data: humanizing data viz
Jina Valentine
2 week course || PRINT 656 001 || 3 credit hours

Siri and Alexa know you better than your mom. Amazon reminds you to buy her a birthday present from her wish list. Google maps thinks you should try that new Thai restaurant because it’s Thursday and you always order Thai on Thursday. Your Target coupons predicted x y z. In this dystopian era, all of human experience is quantifiable, trackable, and subjected to data-driven marketing techniques.  In news media, data visualization attempts to qualify quantitative data to craft compelling stories, affect legislation, or generate support for a cause. However detailed the visualizations may be, they often fail to convey the lived experience of the events or phenomena that they illustrate. Data humanism is the study of the disconnect that exists between quantitative data and lived experience. Artists examining and representing this data can offer new ways of imagining those connections between life in numbers and map points and sensual experience. In this course, students will examine various data sets related to their individual interests. We will investigate ways to see how our lives and searches are tracked online through search history analytics, google maps analytics, and various other metrics; we will look at census data and cultural data related to sociopolitical issues; we will see how data is organized and made available to the public through various online archives including Wikipedia and the Library of Congress. The course is not media specific, but will focus on drawing, painting, collage techniques, and interventions in public space (a lá the Situationist International). Virtual guest presentations will include researchers in media theory, programmers from the Wikimedia Foundation, data visualization specialists, and artists who transform data visualizatio


FACULTY

Jina Valentine   LITERACY TESTS: RORSCHACH   iron gall ink on paper made from Sea Isle Cotton shirts (10 in series) 14 x 20” irregular 2016

Jina Valentine
LITERACY TESTS: RORSCHACH
iron gall ink on paper made from Sea Isle Cotton shirts (10 in series)
14 x 20” irregular
2016

Jina Valentine’s interdisciplinary practice is informed by the intuitive strategies of American folk artists and traditional craft techniques, and interweaves histories latent within found texts, objects, narratives, and spaces. She has exhibited widely, both in her independent work and with her collaborative project, Black Lunch Table. Valentine has participated in numerous residencies including the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, the Santa Fe Art Institute, Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans, and the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris.  She has received grants from the North Carolina Arts Council, Creative Capital, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and Art Matters.  Jina received her BFA from Carnegie Mellon University, her MFA from Stanford University, and is an Assistant Professor of Printmedia at the SAIC.

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Papermaking
Jun
2
to Jun 15

Papermaking

Papermaking
Andrea Peterson
2 week course || PAPER 604 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $100

Paper is an exciting and elusive art medium. Paper pulp can be transformed into sculptural works, drawings with pulp and unusual surface textures. It can allude to skin, metal, rock, or represent something entirely unique. In class, we will explore these possibilities as we examine other artists using pulp as a contemporary medium. Traditional and non-traditional processes, tailored to the capabilities of each fiber, will be explored. Stretch your artistic and technical skills to create unusual works of art.


FACULTY

Andrea Peterson   Fennel #4   cotton rag paper, ink 23 x 31” 2017

Andrea Peterson
Fennel #4
cotton rag paper, ink
23 x 31”
2017

Andrea Peterson is an artist and educator. She lives and creates work in northwest Indiana at Hook Pottery Paper, a studio and gallery co-owned with her husband. She teaches at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Andrea exhibits internationally, most recently at a paper arts exhibit Nature I Impression at the Municipal Gallery in Beer Sheva, Israel. She combines paper arts, printmaking and book arts to make works that address human relationship to the environment. She is a recipient of a 2016/17 Indiana Arts Council Grant.

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Virtual Artifacts: Mold Making, Hydroprinting, and Screenspace Objects
Jun
2
to Jun 15

Virtual Artifacts: Mold Making, Hydroprinting, and Screenspace Objects

Virtual Artifacts: Mold Making, Hydroprinting, and Screenspace Objects
Christopher Meerdo
2 week course || SCULPT 662 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $200

This two week intensive course will introduce participants to the moldmaking process while using the screenspace as source material. This course will consider how non-material modes can manifest into tangible object hood. With a focus on both form and surface, the second half of the class will introduce the hydroprinting technique. Typically used in industrial applications, water transfer printing allows students to reimagine their sculptures rich with surface images. Course readings will include essays that consider historic perspectives on computational visual culture as well as contemporary positions. Scholars and artists include: Rosalind Krauss, Sonia Sheridan, Hiwa K, Prosthetic Knowledge, and Timur Si-Qin. Course assignments will move from screen objects to physical objects, culminating in hydroprinted forms that combine both two and three-dimensional compositional spaces.


FACULTY

Christopher Meerdo
lightbody_astral.jpg
//white_matter_of_left_
cerebral_hemisphere-2.x3d
Extruded polystyrene, hydrocal, plaster, hydroprint, acrylic gloss glaze
36 x 24 x 20 in
2016

Christopher Meerdo is a Chicago-based artist who grew up in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and Lithuania. Meerdo’s work was recently currently featured in a year-long solo exhibition at the Mattress Factory Museum of Contemporary Art in Pittsburgh. He was an artist in residence at the SIM Program in Reykjavik, Iceland and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Meerdo received his MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago and currently teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Exgirlfriend, Berlin; The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL; Coco Hunday, Tampa, FL; Floating Museum, Chicago, IL; Cabinet Magazine, Brooklyn, NY; SIM Gallery, Reykjavik, Iceland; The National Gallery of Kosovo and a traveling exhibition in Birmingham and Leicester, UK. Meerdo is currently a participant at the Jan Van Eyck Academie in Maastricht, Netherlands.

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Remix: Clay and Print
Jun
2
to Jun 15

Remix: Clay and Print

Remix: Clay and Print
Thomas Lucas and Roberto Lugo
2 week course || CER 646 001  || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $150

This course will experiment with hand drawing and printing images on clay using a range of techniques including screen-printing, relief and lithography. Students will also learn how to use different clay slips, stains, and modified underglaze and glazes on low-temperature clay bodies, firing in electric and Raku kilns. Students will look to poetry and graffiti aesthetics to develop visual language with image and text from a socially conscious perspective. Historical and contemporary references will include the work of “Cornbread”, considered the first graffiti artist, the unidentified street artist Bansky, and the written poetry on the city of Pompeii’s walls. Assignments will focus on the production of tiles, vessels and sculpture, as well as the potential for site specific and installation results. The form within the clay can serve as a platform for a range in voice, drawing together concepts such as hip hop, history and politics. Expect a wide range of images, texture, pattern, and color.


FACULTY

Thomas Lucas   The Guardian   stoneware screen  print and litho transfer, cone 10.  2016

Thomas Lucas
The Guardian
stoneware screen
print and litho transfer, cone 10.
2016

Thomas Lucas Born 1971 in Abington, Pennsylvania, Thomas received his MFA with a Merit Scholarship at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Before that he received a BFA in Printmaking at Tyler School of Art, Temple University in Philadelphia, Pa. He has taught at Tyler School of Art, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, Anchor Graphics, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Beacon St. Gallery, Gallery 37, and Penland School of Crafts. Thomas’s Visiting Artists’ Residencies include Penn State University, University of Notre Dame, Harold Washington College, The David Driskell Residency at EPI – Lafayette College, Easton PA. and SkopArt in Skopelos, Greece. His commission awards include Installations for Norwood Park for the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) and 87th station on the Red Line for the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA). He is also the Founder and Master Printer at Hummingbird Press Editions. As a Master Printer Thomas has published such artists as Kerry James Marshall, William Conger, Richard Hunt, Willie Cole and Barbara Jones-Hogu to name a few. His own artworks included in various private and public collections, exhibit nationally and abroad. He is represented by Lusenhop Fine Art, Detroit and N’Namdi Contemporary Miami-Detroit. Thomas was the former Director of Printmaking at Lillstreet Art Center. He now teaches full time at Chicago State University and teaches adjunct at Harold Washington College.


Roberto Lugo,
2pac gun teapot
porcelain
2018

Roberto Lugo is a potter, poet and community activist. He is an Assistant Professor at Tyler School of Art where he teaches ceramics. Roberto Lugo’s work has been exhibited internationally and has been collected by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, MFA Boston, and LACMA. Roberto recently completed his first museum solo exhibition at the Walters Museum responding to the ceramics collection and the history of slavery in Baltimore. Roberto has given lectures at Yale, Harvard, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

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Experimental Watercolor
Jun
2
to Jun 8

Experimental Watercolor

Experimental Watercolor
Hannah Barnes and Susan Klein
1 week course || PAINTING 657 001 || 1 credit hour

This class approaches watercolor from an experimental angle, using chance strategies to create new works. Working from traditional sources such as landscape, students will harness the unpredictable qualities of watercolor to create improvisational, process-based images. Students will have the opportunity to work in a range of styles and motifs, including both representational and abstract images. Located squarely between painting and drawing, watercolor possesses unique material characteristics that lend it to explorations of chance, accident, immediacy, and impermanence. As pigment suspended in a transparent, watery vehicle, watercolor engages the physical forces of gravity and fluidity like no other material. The class will create space for students to explore watercolor’s unique capacities for improvisation. A source of study will be John Cage’s chance based watercolors created at the Mountain Lake Workshop in Virginia between 1983 and 1990. We will also explore techniques developed by Dada, Surrealist, and Fluxus artists to generate unplanned imagery, music, and poetry, and consider how they can be applied to the painting process. A series of daily exercises will introduce students to tools, methods, and strategies. Additionally, students will select a theme to explore independently throughout the class.


FACULTY

Hannah Barnes   PONMUDI   watercolor on paper 22” x 30” 2017

Hannah Barnes
PONMUDI
watercolor on paper
22” x 30”
2017

Hannah Barnes creates work in painting, drawing, and installation that engages structure, impermanence, and the indeterminacy of images through the lens of abstraction. Her projects have been exhibited in such places as the Dhoominal Gallery in New Delhi, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Portland, Maine, and Trestle Gallery in Brooklyn. She recently completed a Fulbright-Nehru Senior Fellowship in India. She was also a recent resident at the Studio Program at MASS MoCA and a Hedda Sterne Fellow at the Vermont Studio Center. Ms. Barnes received an MFA from Rutgers University and a BFA in Painting from Maine College of Art. In 2008, she joined the School of Art at Ball State University, where she teaches painting and drawing.  Born in 1980 and raised on the New England coast, Barnes currently resides and works in Indianapolis. 

Susan Klein
Day Maze and Transmission (foreground)
and Day Breath (background)
oil on ceramic stoneware, plexiglass, wine racks, acrylic on epoxy resin clay and foam, acrylic, graphite, and gouache on canvas
2018

Susan Klein’s practice moves fluidly from painting to drawing to sculpture. Her work revolves around a symbol system that references artifacts, devotional objects, and popular culture, the objects and images becoming artifacts of the present.  She employs a wide range of media to allow color, form, mark, and material to communicate meaning. Klein has exhibited her work both nationally and internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and Sumter County Gallery of Art. She has also shown at The Southern, Charleston, SC, Trestle Gallery, Brooklyn, The Brooklyn Artists Gym, 3433 Gallery, Chicago; PDX Contemporary Art, Portland, OR; University of Ulsan, Korea; Wayne State University, Detroit; as well as other venues. Awards include a full fellowship to the Vermont Studio Center, residency at Ox-Bow School of Art & Artists’ Residency, and a residency at the International Studio and Curatorial Program (Brooklyn). She recently curated the group exhibition Nighttime for Strangers at NARS Foundation (Brooklyn). Currently, she is Assistant Professor of Art at the College of Charleston. She is represented by The Southern, in Charleston, SC

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Beginning Glass, Session I
Jun
2
to Jun 15

Beginning Glass, Session I

Beginning Glass, Session I GLASS 630 001
Victoria Ahmadizadeh 
2 week course || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $300

This course offers hands-on glassblowing experience to the beginner. Participants learn a variety of techniques for manipulating molten “hot glass” into vessel or sculptural forms. Lectures, screenings, demonstrations, and critiques will augment studio instruction.


FACULTY

Victoria Ahmadizadeh    Selective Memory   glass, found denim jacket, mixed media 2018

Victoria Ahmadizadeh
Selective Memory
glass, found denim jacket, mixed media
2018

Victoria Ahmadizadeh is a multi-disciplinary artist investigating the intersection of language and seeing.  She holds an MFA in Craft/Material Studies from Virginia Commonwealth University and a BFA in Glass from Tyler School of Art at Temple University. Victoria has recently been an Emerging Artist in Residence at Pilchuck Glass School, WA and a Fellow at the Creative Glass Center of America, WheatonArts, NJ. She has exhibited in venues such as Glasmuseet Ebeltoft in Denmark, The National Glass Centre in England, DOX Centre for Contemporary Art in the Czech Republic and UrbanGlass in Brooklyn, NY. Her work is included in New Glass Review #33 and #38, published by The Corning Museum of Glass. She currently lives and works in Philadelphia, PA.

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Encaustic and Materiality in Contemporary Painting
Jun
9
to Jun 15

Encaustic and Materiality in Contemporary Painting

Encaustic and Materiality in Contemporary Painting
Kristy Deetz
1 week course || PAINTING 654 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee $100

This course will contextualize encaustics within contemporary painting and materiality. Students will experiment with warm wax, pigment, and collage on paper as a way to uncover new ideas through process and material. Encaustic painting techniques create a variety of rich surface textures that respond to continual reworking. Encaustic lends itself to images that are buried under or embedded within multiple layers of wax and meaning. Students will apply encaustic to paper surfaces with a variety of collage materials to learn a full range of additive and subtractive techniques including fusing, scraping, layering, scraffito, encaustic and oil painting combinations, stencils, block-outs, and image transfers. This course will cover topics such as the deconstruction of the language of painting, abstraction, political, ecological, science and technological advances, ephemeral/durational, and installation. Students will reference The Art of Encaustic Painting by Joanne Mattera and Encaustic Art by Lissa Rankin along with contemporary artists working in the medium, including Byron Kim, Kiki Smith, and Petah Coyne. In-progress critiques and lectures will uncover relationships between materiality and subject to create new ideas and meaning.


FACULTY

Kristy Deetz   Independence Day Cracking   Acrylic on Digital Pattern Printed on Silk  with Embroidery 36” x 36” x 1.5” 2018

Kristy Deetz
Independence Day Cracking
Acrylic on Digital Pattern Printed on Silk
with Embroidery
36” x 36” x 1.5”
2018

Kristy Deetz is a Professor in the Art Discipline at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Her extensive exhibition record includes national and international venues.  She is co-curator of FABRICation that has traveled to art museums, university art galleries, and art centers since 2013. She frequently serves as a visiting artist and has led numerous painting/drawing workshops at venues including Haystack, Oxbow, Penland, and Arrowmont. UWGB awarded her the Founders Award for Excellence in Scholarship in 2011 and she received SECAC’s 2016 Award for Excellence in Teaching. Her paintings have been featured in Encaustic Art in the Twenty-First Century, Encaustic Art—The Complete Guide to Creating Fine Art with Wax, and Full-Range Color Painting for the Beginner. Recently she served as Erasmus Visiting Lectureship at the University of Kassel, Germany, and completed a residency at The Burren College of Art in Ireland.

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Material and Environmental Collaborations
Jun
16
to Jun 29

Material and Environmental Collaborations

Material and Environmental Collaborations
Jeremy Bolen and Rachel Niffenegger
2 week course || PAINTING 655 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $50

How do artists combine material processes with explorations of their surrounding environments? In this course, students will engage the landscape as a medium alongside cyanotypes, van dyke and chlorophyll printing, making natural dyes and “potions”, submerging, burning/fumage, earth recording, burying, sand casting, building armatures, and site-specific constructions. Through the examination of ritual and magic as art practice, as well as the intentional sequencing of material processes, students will accumulate and experiment with modes of creation that transcend disciplinary boundaries. We will be referencing interdisciplinary visionaries such as Ana Mendieta, Otobong Nkanga, Tibor Hajas, Lazlo Moholoy-Nagy, and Mickalene Thomas who synthesize painting, photography, installation and sculpture. Students will conceive of projects around the idea of making as performative action, and will choreograph their experimental processes into final works, imbued with meaning and resonance. These unique material and environmental collaborations will be displayed in a culminating exhibition and guided walk of the works installed throughout Ox-Bow’s campus.


FACULTY

Jeremy Bolen   Vieques #2   archival pigment print made from buried film, window screen, artist’s frame, fragments of buried film 36” x 40” 2015

Jeremy Bolen
Vieques #2
archival pigment print made from buried film, window screen, artist’s frame,
fragments of buried film
36” x 40”
2015

Jeremy Bolen is a Chicago-based artist, researcher, organizer and educator interested in site-specific, experimental modes of documentation, community engagement, and presentation.  Much of Bolen’s work involves rethinking systems of recording in an attempt to observe invisible presences that remain from various scientific experiments and human interactions with the earth’s surface.  Bolen received his MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2012 and he currently serves as Assistant Professor of Photography at Georgia State University and Adjunct Associate Professor of Photography at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is also a founding member of the Deep Time Chicago Collective and is represented by Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago.  

Rachel Niffenegger   Body Streamer (Agony_Ecstasy Continuum)   unique archival inkjet print, laminated with frame 12” x 23” 2018

Rachel Niffenegger
Body Streamer (Agony_Ecstasy Continuum)
unique archival inkjet print, laminated with frame
12” x 23”
2018

Rachel Niffenegger’s work has been included in group shows shows at Museum for Modern Art in Arnhem, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Tracy Williams Ltd in New York, Bourouina Gallery in Berlin, Ceri Hand Gallery in Liverpool, The Suburban in Milwaukee, and in Chicago at Corbett vs. Dempsey, Andrew Rafacz Gallery, and the Hyde Park Art Center. In 2012 she completed a 9-month residency at DE ATELIERS in Amsterdam. Chicago Magazine named her “Chicago’s best emerging artist” in 2010 and Newcity named her one of “Chicago’s Next Generation of Image Makers” in 2010, this after naming her the “Best Painter Under 25” in 2009. Niffenegger, born in Evanston in 1985, received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her MFA from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. She is represented by Western Exhibitions in Chicago and lives and works in Chicago.

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Ghost in the Machine
Jun
16
to Jun 29

Ghost in the Machine

Ghost in the Machine
Sarah Belknap and Joseph Belknap
2 week course || PHOTO 611 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $50

“I cannot find my center of gravity—” Mary Anne Atwood - This class utilizes and facilitates ways of perceiving beyond the human machine. Using various light sensitive medias, the darkroom, film and digital cameras, solar and nighttime telescopes, binoculars, sound recorders, and night vision cameras, we explore time and the properties of waves. We will produce images, videos, sound installations, and performances. Beyond studio work we will look into art, cinema, and literature as works exploring themes in science, time, and perception. Practices by numerous artist will be explored including but not limited to James Turrell, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Werner Herzog, Simon Starling, Carsten Nicolai, Sarah Charlesworth and Alan Lightman.


FACULTY

Sarah and Joseph Belknap   The Planets (video still)   A collaboration with the Lakeview Orchestra 2018

Sarah and Joseph Belknap
The Planets (video still)
A collaboration with the Lakeview Orchestra
2018

Sarah Belknap and Joseph Belknap are Chicago-based interdisciplinary artists and educators who received their MFAs from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Working as a team since 2008, their art has been exhibited in artist-run exhibition spaces in Springfield, Brooklyn, Detroit, Minneapolis, Kansas City and St. Louis. In addition, they have presented performances at institutions throughout Chicago, including the Chicago Cultural Center, Hyde Park Art Center, Links Hall, and the MCA. Their work has been shown in group exhibitions at San Francisco Art Institute Galleries (San Francisco, California) the Columbus Museum of Art, the Chicago Artists’ Coalition, Western Exhibitions, and solo shows at The Arts Club of Chicago and at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. Their work was recently included in the book, Weather as Medium by Janine Randerson, in the Leonardo Series through MIT Press.

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Finding Nature: Words + Glass
Jun
16
to Jun 29

Finding Nature: Words + Glass

Finding Nature: Words + Glass
Joanna Roche and Hiromi Takizawa
2 week course || GLASS 646 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee $300

Taught by a glass artist and poet-art historian, this interdisciplinary, experience-driven class covers the fundamentals of glass working in tandem with writing. Daily walks and journaling around the dunes, lagoon and lake shore of the campus will expand into writing time, followed by time in the hotshop. By responding to local observations and experiences via words and glass, students will develop skills in close looking, focused writing, and transforming their ideas into the poetic medium of glass. The basics of glassblowing in both solid and blown form will be covered, but students are encouraged to experiment. As the course progresses writing and studio time will inform each other, as students move between nature, words, and glass, examining the shared phenomena of reflectiveness, fragility, fluidity and transparency. Emphasis is on artistic concept and the relation of studio practice to seeing and writing, using a range of authors as inspiration, including Junichiro Tanizaki, Gaston Bachelard and Henry David Thoreau. Daily discussion and studio critiques are a fundamental part of this course. Students should expect to produce a collection of writings and several glass pieces, which could be combined into a culminating work that is site-specific or performative.


FACULTY

Joanna Roche earned her PhD in art history from UCLA. She is Professor of Art History at California State University, Fullerton and continues to be inspired by the talent and work ethic of her students. Areas of research include contemporary performance art, assemblage art and the interrelation of memory and artistic process. She is the author of numerous essays and reviews on contemporary art, as well as a book of poetry, Tyrannical Angels.

Hiromi Takizawa   The Little Things   Kiln-formed and blown glass Each rock approximately 3” x 2.5” x 2” 2015

Hiromi Takizawa
The Little Things
Kiln-formed and blown glass
Each rock approximately 3” x 2.5” x 2”
2015

Hiromi Takizawa was born and raised in Nagano, Japan and lives in southern California. She received an MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and is currently an Assistant Professor in Glass at California State University, Fullerton. Curiosity, experimentation, narrative, and materiality are the core concepts in her work. Hiromi has exhibited nationally and internationally including solo exhibitions at Heller Gallery and Urban Glass in New York, and group exhibitions in Ohio, Michigan, Virginia, and Bergen, Norway.

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Screenprinting: Improvisation and Control
Jun
16
to Jun 29

Screenprinting: Improvisation and Control

Screenprinting: Improvisation and Control
Sonnenzimmer (Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi)
2 week course || PRINT 638 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $100

Over this two week course, students will be introduced to the screenprinting process through an improvisational approach to print production. Rather than reproducing preplanned images, students will be challenged to sculpt images with compositional and conceptual integrity by harnessing the additive and modular nature of the process. A variety of hand and photographic stencil making techniques will be demonstrated and encouraged.


FACULTY

Sonnenzimmer is the collective output of Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi. Their work explores the contemporary and historic impact of the graphic impulse through publishing, exhibitions, graphic design, and performance. While the duo works in an array of media, their focus is on triangulating a deeper understanding of the role of graphic expression at large. In addition to their self-driven work, Sonnenzimmer actively engages in commissioned projects aiming to reshape preconceived notions of the graphic arts. Their work has been shown in The United States, Brazil, China, and Europe; with recent solo exhibitions at Vebikus Kunsthalle Schaffhausen, Switzerland, and Hatch Show Print in Nashville, Tennessee.

Sonnenzimmer  (Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi)    Stiff [.cava] & Swipe [.cava]   Screen print on punched synthetic felt,  modular acrylic peg system 24 x 36” each 2017

Sonnenzimmer
(Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi)
Stiff [.cava] & Swipe [.cava]
Screen print on punched synthetic felt,
modular acrylic peg system
24 x 36” each
2017

Sonnenzimmer  (Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi)   Shape Song U   Casted plastic, screen print transfer, hanging/standing wire, 12 x 9 x 1” 2018

Sonnenzimmer
(Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi)
Shape Song U
Casted plastic, screen print transfer, hanging/standing wire, 12 x 9 x 1”
2018

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Metamorphosing Paper
Jun
16
to Jun 22

Metamorphosing Paper

Metamorphosing Paper
Andrea Peterson
1 week course || PAPER 605 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee: $50

Metamorphosis is an entity’s transformation from its original structure into another form. In this one week course, we will develop an understanding of paper fiber, in tandem with surface modifications, to create works of art. We will be using pulps that can be highly pigmented or translucent to create effects only possible with paper fiber. Watermarking and other techniques will be explored to create the illusion of entirely new surfaces. The transformed papers will be soft, rigid, textured, stained, dyed, marbled, waxed, etc. Handmade papers are strong, durable and lightweight and can handle several alterations—allowing them to reference something entirely new.


FACULTY

Andrea Peterson   Fennel #4   cotton rag paper, ink 23 x 31” 2017

Andrea Peterson
Fennel #4
cotton rag paper, ink
23 x 31”
2017

Andrea Peterson is an artist and educator. She lives and creates work in northwest Indiana at Hook Pottery Paper, a studio and gallery co-owned with her husband. She teaches at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Andrea exhibits internationally, most recently at a paper arts exhibit Nature I Impression at the Municipal Gallery in Beer Sheva, Israel. She combines paper arts, printmaking and book arts to make works that address human relationship to the environment. She is a recipient of a 2016/17 Indiana Arts Council Grant.

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Miniatures/Models/Massives: Making and Unmaking Monumental Sculpture
Jun
16
to Jun 29

Miniatures/Models/Massives: Making and Unmaking Monumental Sculpture

Miniatures/Models/Massives: Making and Unmaking Monumental Sculpture
Eliza Myrie
2 week course || SCULPT 664 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $150

Monuments are vessels for collective remembrance. They define the ways in which society is expected and directed to behave in the face of the events and/ or persons represented. Monuments offer an opportunity to express, reflect upon, and externalize emotions through a form. They are often at a scale that demands our attention. This course will collectively examine what defines a monument. Students will look at events and people who society has deemed worth memorializing, and the impact these memorial forms have on ourselves and our culture. Studying monuments made or erected post-1950, the class will engage a long view of historical events and artists working contemporarily at a monumental scale. Works and attendant texts include The Vietnam Veterans Memorial, The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, The AIDS Memorial Quilt, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, Bear’s Ears, Thomas Hirschhorn’s Gramsci Monument, Maren Hassinger’s Monuments, Tehching Hsieh’s One Year Performance 1980/1981, Lauren Halsey’s The Crenshaw District Hieroglyph Project, Claes Oldenburg’s proposed monuments, Michael Rakowitz’s A Color Removed, and Robert Smithson’s A Tour of the Monuments of Passaic, New Jersey. Students will complete quick in-class exercises designed to jumpstart sculpting and will be expected to complete three finished works, two individually and one as a group. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and critiques, as well as complete written responses to texts. The final group project will be presented to the larger Ox-Bow community in a celebration, ceremony or memorial parade designed by the class.


FACULTY

Eliza Myrie   Building a Wall Through My Father   (dress rehearsal) concrete, wood, plastic film, pine, MDF each element approximately 6 x 8 x 10 inches table, 192 x 22 x 50 inches 2016

Eliza Myrie
Building a Wall Through My Father (dress rehearsal)
concrete, wood, plastic film, pine, MDF
each element approximately 6 x 8 x 10 inches
table, 192 x 22 x 50 inches
2016

Eliza Myrie, b. 1981, New York. Myrie received her MFA from Northwestern University and was a participant at the Skowhegan School. Myrie has been an artist-in-residence at Bemis Center, Yaddo, SFAI, MacDowell Colony, and University of Chicago and received grants from Propellor Fund and 3Arts Projects. She is a lecturer at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and co-founder of The Black Artists Retreat [B.A.R.]. Exhibitions include Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago (2018); Gallery 400, Chicago (2017); Vox Populi, Philadelphia (2016); Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago (2016); Roots & Culture, Chicago (2014); the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Chicago (2012); New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2011). Myrie’s work considers labor and laboring as a physical and conceptual endeavor that intersects and complicates assignations/delineations of value across gender, socioeconomic, racial, etc. categories.

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Stitch
Jun
23
to Jun 29

Stitch

Stitch
Melissa Leandro
1 week course || FIBER 620 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee: $50

This course explores traditional and nontraditional means of altering and enriching the surface of pliable material using techniques such as embroidery, embellishment, hand and machine stitching, and in combination with paint, adhesives, applique, and collage. Emphasis is on the surface treatment and its relationship to structure while using both conventional and non-conventional materials. Students are encouraged to pursue conceptual concerns; individual and group critiques are integral to the course.


FACULTY

Melissa Leandro   Flores y Conejos   jacquard woven cloth, dye, foil, linen, stitching 48.50h x 36w in 2018

Melissa Leandro
Flores y Conejos
jacquard woven cloth, dye, foil, linen, stitching
48.50h x 36w in
2018

Melissa Leandro (b. 1989, USA) works between the media of drawing, painting, and textiles. She was awarded the Toby Devan Lewis Fellowship (2017), the EAGER Grant for research and collaboration (2016, Shapiro Center), both for her studio work at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC). She was awarded the Luminarts Fellowship (2017) from the Union League of Chicago. Leandro was a BOLT resident at the Chicago Artist Coalition, and was named one of Chicago's Break Out Artists of the year for 2018. Her work is featured in LUXE, Luxe Interiors + Design Magazine (June 2018).Leandro has attended ACRE Residency, Wisconsin, Roger Brown House Residency, Michigan, The Weaving Mill, Chicago and TextielLab, The Netherlands and the Jacquard Center, North Carolina. She holds a BFA and MFA from SAIC and is currently teaching at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago as Lecturer.

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Expansions: Skill Building for Advanced High School Artists
Jun
30
to Jul 6

Expansions: Skill Building for Advanced High School Artists

Expansions: Skill Building for Advanced High School Artists
Claire Arctander
1 week course || PAINTING 401 001 || 1 credit hour

This pre-college class will entail individual and collective explorations of foundational aspects of artmaking. Participants will establish a community in which they draw from observation, make found object sculptures, and devise site - specific installations to investigate our current surroundings. Students will engage in mark-making and sculptural and performative experiments to learn about ourselves, our values, and our location. Using materials, sites and content found in and around Ox-Bow’s campus, students will begin to develop an understanding of the reasons why art is made. By week’s end, students will decide upon a central question and present a group show of works responding to that theme. Students will gain technical skills in observational drawing, formal skills in organizing objects into coherent artworks, and conceptual skills in developing strong ideas behind their art-making practice. The students’ interests and priorities will help dictate the direction of the course and the resulting exhibition.


FACULTY

Claire Arctander   American Standard   vintage toilet paper and latch hooked yarn 2017

Claire Arctander
American Standard
vintage toilet paper and latch hooked yarn
2017

Claire Arctander is an artist in Chicago. Working across multiple mediums, she joyfully articulates conflicted feminist notions of desire and desirability. Arctander’s works refer to and respectfully pervert the aesthetics of women’s creative outputs throughout American history. Via an investment in and respectful treatment of abject, lush materials and low-brow media outlets—such as pop music, home decor, porn, handicrafts, edibles, and consumer ephemera—she posits debasement as a viable position from which to critically operate. She works as a teaching artist at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and at Weinberg/Newton Gallery. She has been a resident at The Cooper Union, Summer Forum, ACRE, and Ox-Bow. Her work has recently appeared at Franklin Street Works in Stamford, Spektrum in Berlin, Lula Cafe in Chicago, and Eastern Michigan University’s Ford Gallery.

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Uniquely Printed Multiples: The Impossible Task of Monotype Mastery
Jun
30
to Jul 6

Uniquely Printed Multiples: The Impossible Task of Monotype Mastery

Uniquely Printed Multiples: The Impossible Task of Monotype Mastery 
Leah Mackin
1 week course || PRINT 657 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee: $50

This course is an exploration and investigation of various approaches to the foundational printmaking process of monotype, with the explicit goal of generating a large quantity of printed works that realize the unlimited potential of a print. Utilizing both press-based, silkscreen, and hand-printing techniques, students will incorporate drawing, painting, stencils, photographic image transfers, and found materials. Production will be paired with critical dialogue concerning content and transformation of prints into book forms, serialized images, and sculptural installations. Study of historic and contemporary approaches to the monotype process include looking at examples of printed works by artists such as Tracey Emin, Alison Saar, Shlomith Haber-Schaim, Milton Avery, and Henri Matisse. Readings to provide framework for discussions include a poetic inquiry by Richard Tuttle and a comprehensive history of the medium - The Monotype: The History of a Pictorial Art by Carla Esposito Hayter. Through experimentation and practice of the variety of techniques covered, students should expect to complete multiple works, or even a series of works, to be presented in-progress at a mid-course critique and a final critique.


FACULTY

Leah Mackin   Soft Control: Scanimations   animated GIFs, digital images, inkjet print, edition of 3 2017

Leah Mackin
Soft Control: Scanimations
animated GIFs, digital images, inkjet print, edition of 3
2017

Leah Mackin is a visual artist who explores themes of reflection, response, and re-creation. She has received a number of awards, scholarships and honors, including a Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Archives Research Residency, an Artist’s Book Residency Grant at the Women’s Studio Workshop, both a Fall Residency Award and a LeRoy Neiman Scholarship to attend the Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency, and a solo show award as a finalist in The Print Center’s 90th Annual Competition. Mackin holds an MFA in Studio Art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BFA in Printmaking + Book Arts from The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. She is currently a faculty member at the Book Arts Center at Wells College in Aurora, NY.

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Power Objects and Alter Egos
Jun
30
to Jul 13

Power Objects and Alter Egos

Power Objects and Alter Egos
Joanna Powell and Anthony Sonnenberg
2 week course || CER 649 001  || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $150

Artists throughout time have constructed symbolic figures and avatars to represent idealized versions of our identities. In this course students will develop alter egos as a means to explore personal, social, and political power dynamics through artistic practice. Unfired clay will act as a material metaphor for identities in flux and anchor more expansive approaches to sculpture, performance, and installation art and act as a point of departure for considering performative and ephemeral approaches to character development and world building. Artists including Caravaggio, David Altmejd, and Walter McConnell will be referenced alongside contemporary drag performance, comics and mythological narratives to present students with a wide range of strategies for constructing characters and environments. No previous knowledge or working experience with clay is necessary for this course, although a willingness to get dirty and take chances will be, take chances and possibly make a fool of oneself will be. Students will create projects using hand-building techniques in combination with found objects and activated through performance and installation contexts. 


FACULTY

Joanna Powell   A Simple Complicated Truth    ceramic, canvas, acrylic, plastic, 10’x4’x7’9” 2014

Joanna Powell
A Simple Complicated Truth
ceramic, canvas, acrylic, plastic, 10’x4’x7’9”
2014

Joanna Powell (b. 1981, Dallas, TX) holds an MFA from The University of Colorado,Boulder and a BFA from The University of North Texas in Denton. Through installation she contextualizes common objects with personal meaning. Her work is the result of thinking about longing, privacy, history and sexuality. Powell has exhibited her work throughout the United States. Her most recent solo exhibition, Everything belongs to you, was held at the Denison Artspace in Newark, Ohio. She has been a resident artist at The Archie Bray Foundation, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Kansas State University and Denison University. In 2015 she was granted an Emerging Artist award from the National Council on Education for Ceramic Arts. Currently she resides in Helena, Montana and is a full-time studio artist and traveling lecturer.

Anthony Sonnenberg   Model for a Monument (Dreams last for so long, even after you’re gone)   Porcelain over stoneware, found ceramic  tchotchkes, glaze  35h x 15w x 15d in 2018

Anthony Sonnenberg
Model for a Monument (Dreams last for so long, even after you’re gone)
Porcelain over stoneware, found ceramic
tchotchkes, glaze
35h x 15w x 15d in
2018

Anthony Sonnenberg was born in Graham, Texas. He holds an MFA in Ceramics from the University of Washington in 2012 and a BA in Studio Art with an emphasis in Art History and Italian from the University of Texas, Austin in 2009. Crowns and candlesticks—things made in the moments just before a crash—are the subject of his work. His sculptural assemblages are made using a range of materials including ceramic, fiber, metal, papercut, drawing, performance, and photography. He has been the recipient of artist residencies at venues including the Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts, Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Pilchuck Glass School, Yaddo Artist Residency, Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency, and Lawndale Artist Studio Program. He is the recipient of the 2014 RPF Grant from The New Foundation. His work has been exhibited widely across the United States and his first museum solo exhibition, Still Stage, Set Life took place in 2018 at the Art Museum of South East Texas in Beaumont, TX.

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Hard Lines: Drawing with Steel
Jun
30
to Jul 6

Hard Lines: Drawing with Steel

Hard Lines: Drawing with Steel
Devin Balara
1 week course || SCULPT 663 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee: $50

This hybrid sculpture and drawing course will focus on steel fabrication and the translation of line on paper to line in space. Students will learn to use steel as a drawing material with demonstrations in hot and cold bending, modular construction, welding, and finishing strategies. Technical demos and work time will accompany discussions about daily sketchbook practices and the ways in which literal weight can be given to simple doodles or cartoon graphics. This course is suitable for all levels of shop experience; students will quickly gain confidence with equipment and be encouraged to play and improvise independently with the material at as large a scale as they choose. Students are required to complete 3 assignments over the course of the week, one which will reinforce basic knowledge of linear steel fabrication and safety, and two further assignments, utilizing linear steel drawings at the scale of the student’s choosing. Ultimately, students may deploy work into a particular site or landscape and let their sketches stretch their legs.

FACULTY

Devin Balara    Oh Shoot You Guys   Enamel, Steel, Wood 8' x 8' x 6' 2017

Devin Balara
Oh Shoot You Guys
Enamel, Steel, Wood
8' x 8' x 6'
2017

Devin Balara’s work pokes at the clumsy and absurd ways nature is deployed and consumed using sculptural illustrations inspired by bad omens, mirages, desert island logic, and the outdoors as both picturesque and unruly. Employing steel as a drawing material allows the imagery to freely distort and relate to surrounding space and objects, shifting perspective and narrative with each new line of sight.

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Weird Works: Strategies for a New Glass
Jun
30
to Jul 13

Weird Works: Strategies for a New Glass

Weird Works: Strategies for a New Glass
Ben Wright
2 week course || GLASS 630 002 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $300

This class will use glass to translate observations of inspirational phenomena and systems into conceptual artworks.  Through a combination of sketches, immediate responses and longer projects students will work through the creative phases of observation, synthesis, modeling and realization in a supportive and catalytic learning environment. Brief daily readings will explore our favorite weird thinkers from Hunter s Thompson and George Orwell to Dr. Seuss and Buckminster Fuller. These visionaries will inspire and drive our material experiments beyond the well-worn paths of traditional investigations.  Glass lessons will include blowing, casting, cold working and a variety of less orthodox approaches. The class will respond by inventing techniques to address the concepts imbedded in individual projects and lead students towards a thoughtfully experimental approach to artmaking. Students should expect to produce a body of work consisting of 3-5 finished pieces during the course, to be presented in a culminating critique.


FACULTY

Ben Wright   Detail of The Curious Tale Of The Love Nut: An Anthropomorphic Love Story For The Anthropocene   still image from a live performance at the Chrysler Museum of Art, 2018

Ben Wright
Detail of The Curious Tale Of The Love Nut: An Anthropomorphic Love Story For The Anthropocene
still image from a live performance at the Chrysler Museum of Art, 2018

Ben Wright holds a BS in Evolutionary Biology from Dartmouth College, a BFA in Glass from the Appalachian Center for Crafts, and an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. While at Dartmouth, he explored forests from upstate New Hampshire to tropical Jamaica to record and map songbirds for the renowned ornithologist Richard Homes. His background in biology figures strongly in his artwork, which delves deeply into the every evolving relationship between humans and their environment. Through work ranging from interactive visual installations to sonic landscapes he engages all of his viewers’ senses and often bridges the gap between art and science. He has taught his unique approach to art making at numerous schools including Pilchuck Glass School, Penland School of Craft, the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and abroad in Germany, Turkey, Denmark and Japan. He is currently the Director of Education at UrbanGlass in Brooklyn, New York.

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The Portrait As Starting Point
Jul
7
to Jul 13

The Portrait As Starting Point

The Portrait As Starting Point
Dylan Rabe 
1 week course || PAINTING 614 001 || 1 credit hour

This class will focus on issues raised in painting, particularly portraits and self-portraits, translating what is known and seen into the formal vocabulary of paint. Sources will include direct observation of the subject and the imagination. Students will investigate form and content as well as materials and techniques. Students may choose to work with oil-based media with odorless solvents, or water-based media. Slide lectures and critiques will be included.


FACULTY

Dylan Rabe   In Absinthia   oil and ink on canvas 2018

Dylan Rabe
In Absinthia
oil and ink on canvas
2018

Dylan Rabe is an artist living and working in Chicago. He predominantly makes hybrid ink and oil paintings, combining traditional techniques with automatic drawing and surrealist compositional strategies to give form to the subconscious, or an emotionally heightened vision of the external world. He received his BFA and MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and has exhibited paintings, drawings, and animations at Chicago venues including the Beverly Arts Center, Julius Caesar, The Research House for Asian Art, Iceberg Projects, and Rare Visions in Boulder, Colorado.  He is currently a lecturer at SAIC.

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Dimensional Collage
Jul
7
to Jul 13

Dimensional Collage

Dimensional Collage
Annalee Koehn
1 week course || PAINTING 653 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee: $50

This week-long class combines traditional collage concepts and paper construction styles to explore a structural approach to image and form using found imagery and materials. Deliberate or makeshift, there is a body of artist collage referencing the world of 3D objects such as paper toys, games, and packaging. Informed by the tradition of artists’ collage and assemblage work, including Eileen Agar, Romare Bearden, Joseph Cornell, Hannah Hoch, Claes Oldenburg, Pablo Picasso, Betye Saar and Kurt Schwitters, this class will explore and expand the possibilities of 3D structural imagery, function, utility, and content building. Students will employ traditional materials and tools such as bristol board, exacto knife, scissors, tape and glue, and a stockpile of colored papers, found images, other printed materials. Students will come away with a collection of meaningful objects that incorporate their personal vision and an expanded visual vocabulary.


FACULTY

Annalee Koehn   Double Hurricane   Fabric and mixed media collage 2012

Annalee Koehn
Double Hurricane
Fabric and mixed media collage
2012

Annalee Koehn is a Chicago-based artist and musician, and teaches at SAIC in the Designed Objects department. Her work is primarily structural, but spans disciplines and materials, sometimes defying categorization. Threads that run throughout are an exploration of physical and metaphorical properties of materials, cause-and-effect, and the interplay of form and function. Koehn’s work has been shown at Galerie POWERHOUSE, Montreal, the Chicago Cultural Center, Frederick Layton Gallery at MIAD, Vanderbilt University, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Illinois State Museum, Randolph Street Gallery and others, and she has multiple grants, awards and 8 US Patents. She earned her MFA from Louisiana State University and BFA from University of Illinois. Other teaching includes Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, West Virginia University, Oakton College, and traditional music and harmony singing at The Augusta Heritage Center.

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Casting in Context
Jul
7
to Jul 13

Casting in Context

Casting in Context
Steven Haulenbeek and Pete Oyler
1 week course || SCULPT 665 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee: $100

This one-week design focused class will explore the relationship between industrial approaches to production and the natural environment. Making use of Ox-Bow’s unique location, natural, raw, found materials will be used as source material for mold making and on-site metal casting of functional objects. With an emphasis on finding creative ways to use readily available materials in the design process, this class will emphasize hands-on learning and students will develop skills in mold making, casting, and iterative design thinking. Students will work collaboratively throughout the casting process and will embrace a process based approach to making functional objects. Drawing inspiration from process-based designers working at various scales of production–including Hella Jongerius, Max Lamb, Chen Chen and Kai Williams–this course will explore how a range of contemporary designers expand traditional approaches to making objects and develop new processes through iteration. Readings by design critics David Pye, Alice Rawsthorn, and Murray Moss will help to inform and contextualize studio discussions. Key to all course content is an emphasis on different approaches to independent studio practice and production methods.By the end of this course, students should expect to produce one functional cast object and have thorough documentation of process.

FACULTY

Steven Haulenbeek   Ice-Cast Bronze Lace Vessel #1   Cast Bronze 2018

Steven Haulenbeek
Ice-Cast Bronze Lace Vessel #1
Cast Bronze
2018

Steven Haulenbeek is a Chicago based industrial designer and artist. He received his bachelors in drawing and sculpture from Hope College in Holland, Michigan in 2002 and received his Masters degree in Designed Objects from SAIC in 2006. In 2010 he founded his independent design practice with the interest in experimental, material, and process-based objects for the home. Steven Haulenbeek Studio is represented by Carpenters Workshop Gallery in Paris,

London and New York as well at The Future Perfect in New York and San Francisco. Steven’s work passes by the typical design/build format and instead seeks to invent a production framework by which objects emerge more organically. “Ice-Cast Bronze” and “Resin-Bonded Sand” are two of his best-know experimental processes developed in this spirit. TheIce-Cast Bronze collection pairs the natural freezing cold climate of the Chicago winter with the lost-wax process to create uniquely textured objects and furniture in cast bronze. The RBS Series (Resin-Bonded Sand) utilizes silica sand, a typically disposable industrial byproduct, to create colorful sculptural objects, furniture and lighting.

Pete Oyler   Title: L4.2-2   Materials: Ash

Pete Oyler
Title: L4.2-2
Materials: Ash

Pete Oyler is a product and furniture designer whose work explores the intersections of design, craft, contemporary culture, and history. Oyler produces work for license and larger volume production under his own name and is a Principal at Assembly Design, an award-winning studio he co-founded with interior designer Nora Mattingly. His studio practice emphasizes both traditional and experimental approaches to a wide range of materials and methods of production. His work has been exhibited and published internationally and he has received numerous awards including Forbes’ “30 Under 30”, the Metropolis “Likes Award for Innovation in Design”, Sight Unseen’s “American Design Hot List,” and Newcity’s “Design 50: Who Shapes Chicago.” Based in Chicago, Oyler is an Assistant Professor in Designed Objects at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Thought Collections: Exploring Book Structures
Jul
7
to Jul 13

Thought Collections: Exploring Book Structures

Thought Collections: Exploring Book Structures
Regin Igloria
1 week course || PRINT 648 001 || 1 credit hour

This course introduces bookbinding skills to students who will create a series of different hand-bound books, from pamphlets and stab bindings to more complex codex-style structures like the Coptic and long stitch. Each morning the instructor will introduce new binding techniques, and will follow up with an afternoon of content-building exercises using the environment, landscape, and a variety of drawing and collage materials. Students will explore ways of gathering and manipulating information in a portable format, resulting in a small volume of hand-held works.


FACULTY

Regin Igloria   A List For You (Original Detail Drawing)   Artists’ book (Photocopies on paper, edition 100) 4.25” x 5.5” 2017

Regin Igloria
A List For You (Original Detail Drawing)
Artists’ book (Photocopies on paper, edition 100)
4.25” x 5.5”
2017

Regin Igloria is a multidisciplinary artist and educator based in Chicago. His drawings, artists’ books, sculptures, and performances portray the human condition as it relates to the natural environment and inhabited spaces. With several years of arts administration and teaching under his belt, he founded North Branch Projects, an organization that builds connections through the book arts. Igloria has taught at places such as Marwen, RISD, The School of the art Institute of Chicago, Snow City Arts, and Carthage College to name a few. He received a 3Arts Individual Artist Award as well as local, national, and international grants and support through artist residencies, and has exhibited internationally. He received his MFA from Rhode Island School of Design.

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Beyond Observation: Embodiment and Materiality in the Landscape
Jul
14
to Jul 27

Beyond Observation: Embodiment and Materiality in the Landscape

Beyond Observation: Embodiment and Materiality in the Landscape
Carris Adams
2 week course || PAINTING 656 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $50

In Beyond Observation, students are invited to redefine their perceptions and interactions with the landscape through various approaches to observational painting. While gaining proficiency in the techniques and vocabulary of painting, students will develop new ways of representing the landscape outside notions of the “serene” and “pastoral” while considering moments of their body/mind in the space. Artists’ work and writings will be provided as inspiration for assignments such as Andreas Siqueland, Rodney McMillian, Josephine Halvorson, Lari Pittman, Emily Cheng. Students will be challenged to experiment with the material properties of paint, language, principles and elements of design to compose a painting that embodies an exchange between the maker and the surrounding world.

FACULTY

Carris_Adams_2.jpg

Carris Adams is a visual artist whose practice visually investigates markers  of domesticated space. Her conceptually multi-layered works seek to inform and position viewers to recognize their assumptions, recall an experience and perhaps note how societal markers materialize in the landscape. Adams received her BFA from the University of Texas at Austin (2013) and her MFA from the University of Chicago (2015). Adams' work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY; The Logan Center Exhibitions at The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Produce Model Gallery, Chicago, IL; Tiger Strikes Asteroid Gallery, Chicago,IL; and The Courtyard Gallery at The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.

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Abrupt Climate Change
Jul
14
to Jul 27

Abrupt Climate Change

Abrupt Climate Change
Mika Tosca
2 week course || SCIENCE 605 001 || 3 credit hours

Since 1970, global temperatures have risen more than a degree Fahrenheit, yet, despite dire warnings from climate scientists, humanity continues to emit climate-warming greenhouse gases at record pace. In the past two decades we have seen the increasing effects of devastating sea level rise, stronger and more powerful storms, longer droughts, deadly heat waves, destructive wildfires, accelerating loss of the world’s rainforests, growing species extinction rates, and changing water availability. In this course, we will explore the scientific explanation of contemporary climate change as well as the economic origins of our fossil fuel addiction. We will discuss future projections of climate change, the underpinnings of modern “climate change denial”, and whether we can avoid what scientists call “catastrophic climate change” in this century. We will consider current news articles and relevant policy solutions/responses, and class work will involve group work, critical thinking, quantitative practice, relevant scientific readings, qualitative homework, quizzes, an exam and a final project.


FACULTY

Mika Tosca   A plot showing increasing surface temperature (black line) in the Southeastern United States in response to declining industrial pollution (red line)

Mika Tosca
A plot showing increasing surface temperature (black line) in the Southeastern United States in response to declining industrial pollution (red line)

Mika Tosca is a trained climate scientist, having completed her Ph.D. work at the University of California, Irvine in 2012. While at Irvine, Dr.Tosca researched the interconnectivity of the climate with landscape fires and particulate (aerosol) emissions. She continued her work as a postdoctoral scholar at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (a contracted lab of NASA) in Pasadena, CA, working under Dr. David Diner. There she continued researching the interactions between climate and landscape fires, even traveling as far as Namibia in 2016 to research the complex relationships between smoke from fires and cloud formation. At SAIC, she has begun to explore whether scientists can work with designers to determine whether reimagining data visualization can help scientists ask better questions. She continues to explore contemporary science questions concerning climate change and has given several invited presentations to various organizations.

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Blacksmithing: Sculptural Forms
Jul
14
to Jul 27

Blacksmithing: Sculptural Forms

Blacksmithing: Sculptural Forms
James Viste
2 week course || SCULPT 623 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $150

This intensive will start with an introduction to the fundamentals of forging, and move rapidly toward advanced projects. We will focus on the hot manipulation of material with the forge, anvil, and hammer as our primary tools. A referential history of forged ironwork (architectural, functional, and sculptural) will serve as a source of inspiration. Students will be encouraged to produce a site-specific piece based on line and its relationship to chosen surroundings on campus.


FACULTY

James Viste   Arc Wave of Scutes

James Viste
Arc Wave of Scutes

James Viste was raised on a farm in Wisconsin, received a Bachelors degree from The University of Wisconsin, La Crosse; and an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, MI. He is a nationally known blacksmithing demonstrator and exhibitor and has participated in several National Ironwork Restoration Projects including Cranbrook Educational Community and the Detroit Institute of Arts. He has worked for studios throughout Minnesota, Wisconsin, New Mexico and Michigan. He is currently the Manager of Edgewise Forge L.L.C., Detroit, MI; and employed as an instructor/technician by the College for Creative Studies, Detroit, MI.

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Materials and Mechanics of Woodfire
Jul
14
to Jul 27

Materials and Mechanics of Woodfire

Materials and Mechanics of Woodfire
Ashwini Bhat and Bruce Dehnert
2 week course || CER 647 001  || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $150

This course is centered around the wood kiln, from its mechanics to the material and conceptual considerations posed through its use. Students will have the opportunity to explore and produce a range of ceramic works, while learning about the relationships that ceramic forms can have to culture, history, personal expression, and social change. Students will be introduced to both historical and contemporary uses of wood-fired ceramics. Some of the reading materials in this course will be “The Kiln Book” by Frederick Olsen; “Theory of Craft” by Howard Risatti, and Building With Fire by Ray Meeker. Documentary film screenings include “Agni Jata” on Ray Meeker’s fired house project; “Traces” exploring theoretical issues regarding Western/Eastern approaches to the production of ceramics and “There Is No Customarily” on the Peters Valley Anagama. Presentations on firing wood kilns in the USA, China, Japan and India will be included. After the first week of making, the wood kiln will be loaded and fired as a team. The wood kiln offers a close up experience to the mechanics of kiln firing, in particular, how fuel and oxygen affect the quality and efficiency of the flame and in turn add to the final aesthetics of the surface. Over the course of thirty hours, the clay, glaze and wood ash will begin to melt in the high heat and create beautiful surface effects. Work will be finished by grinding, sanding and polishing.


FACULTY

Ashwini Bhat   Tactile Language   fired in the salt chamber of Anagama kiln at Cub Creek Foundation, VA, USA 2016

Ashwini Bhat
Tactile Language
fired in the salt chamber of Anagama kiln at Cub Creek Foundation, VA, USA
2016

Ashwini Bhat has an M.A in literature and a background in classical Indian dance for seventeen years. She studied ceramics with Ray Meeker at Golden Bridge Pottery, Pondicherry, India. Her work has been featured internationally in many galleries and exhibitions including, Lacoste Kean Gallery, Companion Gallery, In Tandem Gallery, Cohen Gallery at Brown University, American Jazz Museum, NCECA (2019; 2018; 2016; 2015 and 2013), Newport Art Museum; India Art Fair, Indian Ceramic Trienale; Indian Museum at FLICAM; and Woodfire Tasmania. Her work has been published in Riot Material, Ceramic Art and Perception, Ceramic Ireland, New Ceramics, Caliban, Crafts Arts International, The Studio Potter , and Logbook. She lives and works in Petaluma, CA.

Bruce Dehnert   Venetian   Wood fired and oxidation fired stoneware.  Slips. Glazes.  14”x9”x14”

Bruce Dehnert Venetian
Wood fired and oxidation fired stoneware.
Slips. Glazes.
14”x9”x14”

Bruce Dehnert received a BA in Creative Writing from the University of Montana and his MFA in Ceramics from Alfred University. He has taught at Hunter College, Parsons School of Art and Design, The School of Art [New Zealand], the Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, and the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Dehnert is the recipient of a New Jersey Artist Fellowship Award, and other awards including three time Fletcher Challenge International Ceramics Award winner, the Settlor Prize in Sculpture, and a Carnegie Premier Award for Works on Paper. He was also a finalist in the Robert Wood Johnson International Figurative Competition. His work is held in a number of museums and collections including The Crocker Museum, the Yixing Museum of Ceramic Art , The New Dowse Museum, The Liling Museum of Ceramic Art, The New Museum, and The White House. Dehnert remains active as a writer having had articles published in numerous journals including, Studio Potter, Ceramics Monthly, and Ceramics: Art and Perception. He has written a number of forewords for exhibition catalogs and books, including Woodfired Pottery: Susan Beecher. His bestselling book, Simon Leach’s Pottery Handbook, was recently published by Abrams Publishing of New York City. He is currently writing a biography on noted Japanese artist, Takeshi Yasuda. In 2016, Bruce was named a Fellow to the International Academy of Ceramics. Currently he is Head of Ceramics at Peters Valley School for Crafts in Layton, New Jersey.

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Beginning Glass, Session II
Jul
14
to Jul 27

Beginning Glass, Session II

Beginning Glass, Session II
GLASS 630 002 Deborah Adler
2 week course || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $300

This course offers hands-on glassblowing experience to the beginner. Participants learn a variety of techniques for manipulating molten “hot glass” into vessel or sculptural forms. Lectures, screenings, demonstrations, and critiques will augment studio instruction.


FACULTY

Deborah Adler   Black Bottles   glass 2018

Deborah Adler
Black Bottles
glass
2018

Deborah Adler’s career as a glassblower spans nearly two decades. Of that time, 15 years were spent in New York City working from the studios of UrbanGlass and GlassRoots. She has developed several bodies of work and exhibited them at SOFA Chicago and New York, nationally in numerous galleries, and craft shows. Deborah was also lead gaffer on teams fabricating work for prominent contemporary lighting designers. In 2015, Deborah left New York and relocated to Seattle, where she currently works as an artist assistant, while remaining focused on the design and production of her own work. 

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Alter/Overflow: Garment Making as Studio Practice
Jul
14
to Jul 27

Alter/Overflow: Garment Making as Studio Practice

Alter/Overflow: Garment Making as Studio Practice 
Brad Callahan and Vincent Tiley 
2 week course || FIBER 619 001  || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $100

Using the multifaceted and often conflicting traditions of queer dress as a foundation, this garment-based class will introduce students to a spectrum of Fashion industry and DIY garment making techniques. Students will explore methods of alternative pattern making, up-cycling, textile manipulation, embellishment, and hand techniques to create new wearable art that exists between fashion, performance, and sculpture. Themes of gender, race, desire, fetish, and camp will be explored and expanded in both personal projects and group discussion. Artists and designers whose work will be discussed include but are not limited to Leigh Bowery, Narcissister, Claude Cahun, Rebecca Horn, Stephen Varble, Louise Bourgeois, Raul De Neives, K8 Hardy, Terence Koh and Nayland Blake as well as Patrick Kelly, Adrian, Rudi Gernriech, Eiko Ishioka, Iris van Herpen, Charlie le Mindu, Charles Worth, Paul Poiret, Erte, Jean Paul Lespagnard, and Shaye St. John. Experimentation is encouraged and students are invited to present their work as performances, videos, installations, party-personce, etc.


Vincent Tiley   Scorpions   3hr performance for three performers, brass and leather jewelry 2017

Vincent Tiley
Scorpions
3hr performance for three performers,
brass and leather jewelry
2017

Brad Callahan is a graduate from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. For almost a decade, Brad Callahan’s brand BCALLA has been dressing New York nightlife icons and pop celebrities. His work has been worn by Lady Gaga, Miley Cyrus, and Nicki Minaj and been published in V magazine, Vogue Italia and Dazed and Confused.


Brooklyn based artist Vincent Tiley received a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art. In 2017 he participated in the Fire Island Artist Residency (FIAR) and was a 2013 participant at Artist Cooperative Residency and Exhibition (ACRE) program. His work has been featured and reviewed in Art in America, the Chicago Tribune, and Performa. The artist has been widely exhibited internationally including the Museum of Art and Design, the Leslie-Lohman Museum, AxeNeo7, CFHILL, and the International Museum of Surgical Science.

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Multi-Level Foundry
Jul
28
to Aug 10

Multi-Level Foundry

Multi-Level Foundry
Liz Ensz and Lloyd Mandelbaum
2 week course || SCULPT 660 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $200

In this multilevel metal casting course, students will learn the fundamentals of pattern generation, simple and multi-part mold making techniques with sodium silicate bonded sand, casting with bronze, aluminum, and iron, and finishing and patination techniques for their castings. Explorations will be informed by the materiality of molten metal and molding processes, the history and technologies of metal casting, and discussion of cast metal sculpture in contemporary art. In the spirit of “there is no “I” in foundry,” teamwork and safe foundry practices form the foundation of the course. Students will be encouraged to experiment and respond to the natural environment with patterns made at Ox-Bow in an open-air sculpture studio.


FACULTY

Liz Ensz   Revisionist Landscapes (series)    cast iron 40” x 44” x 20” 2017

Liz Ensz
Revisionist Landscapes (series)
cast iron
40” x 44” x 20”
2017

Liz Ensz was born in Minnesota to a resourceful family of penny-savers, metal scrappers, and curators of cast-offs. With an interdisciplinary approach, their work ruminates on the mass-cultural investment in disposability and the human desire to imagine permanence through emblems, monuments, and commemoration. Ensz has exhibited textiles and sculpture nationwide, including Franconia Sculpture Park, Shafer, MN; Smack Mellon, Brooklyn, NY; Roots and Culture Contemporary Art Center, Chicago, IL; Boston Center for the Arts, Boston, MA; and Goucher College, Baltimore, MD. Awards include The John Michael Kohler Arts/Industry Program in Foundry, Sheboygan, WI; Salem Art Works, Salem, NY: Playa, Summer Lake, OR; LATITUDE, Chicago, IL; and Blue Mountain Center, Blue Mountain Lake, NY; City of Chicago DCASE Individual Artist Grant, and The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Travel Fellowship, among others.

Lloyd Mandelbaum   Part of Sequential Silhouettes Series   aluminum and wood, 19" 2018

Lloyd Mandelbaum
Part of Sequential Silhouettes Series
aluminum and wood, 19"
2018

Lloyd Mandelbaum is an artist and owner of the art casting foundry Chicago Crucible, which has been producing cast bronze, aluminum, and iron sculpture for public and private clientele since 2009. Lloyd received his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with an emphasis in metal arts and has been in the field ever since. Lloyd also designs and builds foundry equipment for himself, other businesses, and institutions. Lloyd’s personal sculpture is figurative and abstract and is intended to evoke an energetic liveliness despite being made of static cast metal. In addition to operating his business and creating his own work, Lloyd has taught, lectured, spoken on panels, and consulted on foundry craft, operation, construction, and development for universities, industry, and individual artists across the country and internationally. 

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The Formal, The Experimental, The Unexpected: New Investigations in Clay
Jul
28
to Aug 10

The Formal, The Experimental, The Unexpected: New Investigations in Clay

The Formal, The Experimental, The Unexpected: New Investigations in Clay
Marie Hermann and Anders Ruhwald
2 week course || CER 648 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $150

This course explores non-traditional and process-based ways of using clay for making sculpture. Students will work from the starting point that there is no right or wrong way of building with clay, and instead embrace the idea of working with clay as a way to explore the world we live in. We will be looking at a range of artists who engage experimental methodologies alongside deeply personal explorations in their creation of ceramic sculpture, including Kathy Butterly, Simone Leigh, and Sterling Ruby. We will also be reading texts including The Hysterical Material by Geof Oppenheimer, Ten Thousand Years of Pottery by Emmanuel Cooper, and Seeing Things by Alison Britton. Through these examples we will begin to understand how clay can be utilized as a medium to make sense of who we are and where we live. Students will embrace the idea of sculpture in its broadest sense, including both the formal and performative aspects of firing and working with clay. Students interested in participating in this workshop should be open to experimentation and un-programmed exploration. Students should expect to produce a body of work consisting of at least 3-5 finished pieces during the course which be presented and discussed in a final course critique. This is not a class for refining what you already know how to do, but a chance to find new ways of working with clay. 


FACULTY

Marie Herwald Hermann   Miles of Silent, But Not Now    porcelain, stoneware, silicone 2018

Marie Herwald Hermann
Miles of Silent, But Not Now

porcelain, stoneware, silicone
2018

Marie Herwald Hermann received her MFA from the Royal College of Art in London in 2009. Since then, she has exhibited extensively and widely. In 2018, her solo exhibitions included Bit by bit above the edge of things, Paris London Hong Kong, Chicago in 2017, Shields and the Parergon at Reyes Projects in Birmingham, MI and dusk turned dawn at Blackthorn at NADA, Miami. In 2016 she presented ‘Northern Light, Pontiac Rise’ at Galerie Nec in Paris and ‘A Gentle Blow to the Rock’ at Gallerie NeC in Hong Kong. She has also presented installations in numerous group exhibitions in the US, Denmark, Italy, China, Sweden and Germany. Her work is held in the collections of the Danish Art Foundation, the Denver Art Museum, the Servre Museum, Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum, the Cranbrook Art Museum, the Jingdezhen Ceramic Art Museum and the Rothschild Collection. In 2013 she was awarded the Kresge Artist Fellowship, the Danish Art Foundation grant in 2009 and 2016, and the Annie and Otto Johs. Detlefs’ grant for young experimental ceramic artists in 2010. Hermann was born in Copenhagen and lives and works in Chicago and is an Assistant Professor at SAIC.

Anders Ruhwald    Like The New Past   Installation View, Denver Art Museum, USA All works are courtesy of the Artist, Moran Moran Gallery, Los Angeles and Volume Gallery, Chicago 2011

Anders Ruhwald
Like The New Past
Installation View, Denver Art Museum, USA
All works are courtesy of the Artist, Moran Moran Gallery, Los Angeles and Volume Gallery, Chicago
2011

Anders Ruhwald (born 1974, Denmark) is a sculptor and installation artist whose practice is grounded in ceramics. He lives and works between Detroit and Chicago and received his MFA from the Royal College of Art in London in 2005. Solo exhibitions include Unit 1: 3583 Dubois at MOCA Cleveland in 2017 more than 30 gallery and museum solo-shows as well as more than 100 group-exhibitions around the world. His work is represented in over 20 public collections including The Victoria and Albert Museum (UK), The Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Denver Art Museum, The National Museum (Sweden) and The Museum of Art and Design (Denmark), From 2008-2017 he was the Head of the Ceramics Department at Cranbrook Academy of Art. Currently he is a Visiting Professor at the National Academy of Arts in Oslo, Norway.

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Lithography: Stone and Photolithography - 2 weeks
Jul
28
to Aug 10

Lithography: Stone and Photolithography - 2 weeks

Lithography: Stone and Photolithography
Danny Miller 
PRINT 637 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee $100

This fast-paced course is designed for both beginners and advanced artists, and will be offered in a two-week sequence. Week one focuses on traditional methods with stone lithography, and week two introduces students to photomechanical lithography using both hand-drawn and digital processes.  Students are encouraged to investigate personal directions in their work as they explore lithographic possibilities through editions and unique variants.  Emphasis will be placed on both conceptual and technical development, and additional demonstrations will be added based on the specific interests and needs of the participants.  Class consists of demonstrations, presentations, work time, discussions, and critiques.  Historical and contemporary lithographic examples will be presented in order to clarify the relationships between idea, context, material, and process.


FACULTY

Danny Miller   humdrum   woodcut, 10.5”w x 11.5”h 2016

Danny Miller
humdrum
woodcut, 10.5”w x 11.5”h
2016

Danny Miller is an artist and musician working in Chicago, IL.  Utilizing woodblock, lithographic printing and drawing, he conjures works inspired by science fiction pulp covers, Victorian engravings, advertisements, comic books and music. Miller has taught at Ohio State University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, SAIC and Ox-Bow School of Art and has been the Printmedia Department Manager at SAIC for 30 years. He received his MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has worked in professional print shops including Landfall Press, Normal Editions Workshop and Four Brothers Press, in addition to playing and teaching traditional fiddle and banjo music at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago.

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Lithography: Stone and Photolithography - 1 week, Session 1
Jul
28
to Aug 3

Lithography: Stone and Photolithography - 1 week, Session 1

Lithography: Stone and Photolithography
Danny Miller 
PRINT 635 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee $50

This fast-paced course is designed for both beginners and advanced artists, and will be offered in a two-week sequence. Week one focuses on traditional methods with stone lithography, and week two introduces students to photomechanical lithography using both hand-drawn and digital processes.  Students are encouraged to investigate personal directions in their work as they explore lithographic possibilities through editions and unique variants.  Emphasis will be placed on both conceptual and technical development, and additional demonstrations will be added based on the specific interests and needs of the participants.  Class consists of demonstrations, presentations, work time, discussions, and critiques.  Historical and contemporary lithographic examples will be presented in order to clarify the relationships between idea, context, material, and process.


FACULTY

Danny Miller   humdrum   woodcut, 10.5”w x 11.5”h 2016

Danny Miller
humdrum
woodcut, 10.5”w x 11.5”h
2016

Danny Miller is an artist and musician working in Chicago, IL.  Utilizing woodblock, lithographic printing and drawing, he conjures works inspired by science fiction pulp covers, Victorian engravings, advertisements, comic books and music. Miller has taught at Ohio State University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, SAIC and Ox-Bow School of Art and has been the Printmedia Department Manager at SAIC for 30 years. He received his MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has worked in professional print shops including Landfall Press, Normal Editions Workshop and Four Brothers Press, in addition to playing and teaching traditional fiddle and banjo music at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago.

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Wet-plate and Platinotypes - 2 Weeks
Jul
28
to Aug 10

Wet-plate and Platinotypes - 2 Weeks

Wet-plate and Platinotypes
Robert Clarke-Davis and Jaclyn Silverman
PHOTO 609 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee $300

Using the historic, time-honored wet-plate collodion and platinotype processes students will move between the studio, community, and natural environment at Ox-Bow to create images and photographic objects. These courses can be taken sequentially for two weeks or individually for one week. The first week will focus on wet-plate collodion; students will explore the fundamentals of large format photography using analog view cameras to create glass-plate negatives in the field. Mobile, onsite darkrooms will allow instant gauging in progress and results. Glass plates can stand alone as photographic objects, or be reproduced in photographic printing. During week two students will work with platinotype printing, one of the most stable photographic processes. Students will use the traditional iron-based developing-out process of platinum palladium. Using digital cameras and laptops to capture images, they will digitally print negatives to be used in this unique tactile process. Those who participate in wet-plate collodion will be able to print directly from their glass plate negatives.


FACULTY

Robert Clarke-Davis   Untitled   2018

Robert Clarke-Davis
Untitled
2018

Robert Clarke-Davis has served as an Associate Professor in Photography at SAIC since 1990. He earned his BA from Beloit College and an MA at the University of London, Goldsmiths’ College, School of Art and Design. His work has exhibited at Cleveland Museum of Art; Milwaukee Art Museum; Wuk Kunsthalle, Vienna; and Magyar Fotogr’fiai M’zeum Kesckem’t, Hungary. His work is held in the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art; Fine Arts Library, Indiana University, IN; Impressions Gallery, North Yorkshire; The Rooms Corporation of Newfoundland and Labrador. He is represented by James Baird Gallery.

Jaclyn Silverman   Jenn and Joel   Blue Rubytype 2018

Jaclyn Silverman
Jenn and Joel
Blue Rubytype
2018

Jaclyn Silverman is from Youngstown, Ohio, living in Chicago, Illinois. She received her BFA in Photography from The Ohio State University, and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work revolves around community, place, and intergenerational histories. She has exhibited in Boulder, CO, Chicago, IL, Youngstown, and Columbus, Ohio. She has been the recipient of the Denman Research Grant from The Ohio State University and Women Artists Against Racism from the YWCA for her ongoing series, The Working Family. Her works are part of permanent collections with The Ohio State University, The Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection, and The Art Institute of Chicago. She and Robert Clarke-Davis curated the exhibition Within the Portfolios: 1968-2016 A History of Photography from the School of the Art Institute with the Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection. Silverman has been a visiting lecturer with The Ohio State University and Part-time Professor at Dominican University in River Forest, IL. Currently, she is Professor of Art and Humanities with Truman College, Artistic Director of Chicago art organization, CPS Lives, and returning faculty member with Ox-Bow School of Art.

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Wet-plate and Platinotypes - 1 week Session 1
Jul
28
to Aug 3

Wet-plate and Platinotypes - 1 week Session 1

Wet-plate and Platinotypes
Robert Clarke-Davis and Jaclyn Silverman
PHOTO 610 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee $150

Using the historic, time-honored wet-plate collodion and platinotype processes students will move between the studio, community, and natural environment at Ox-Bow to create images and photographic objects. These courses can be taken sequentially for two weeks or individually for one week. The first week will focus on wet-plate collodion; students will explore the fundamentals of large format photography using analog view cameras to create glass-plate negatives in the field. Mobile, onsite darkrooms will allow instant gauging in progress and results. Glass plates can stand alone as photographic objects, or be reproduced in photographic printing. During week two students will work with platinotype printing, one of the most stable photographic processes. Students will use the traditional iron-based developing-out process of platinum palladium. Using digital cameras and laptops to capture images, they will digitally print negatives to be used in this unique tactile process. Those who participate in wet-plate collodion will be able to print directly from their glass plate negatives.


FACULTY

Robert Clarke-Davis   Untitled   2018

Robert Clarke-Davis
Untitled
2018

Robert Clarke-Davis has served as an Associate Professor in Photography at SAIC since 1990. He earned his BA from Beloit College and an MA at the University of London, Goldsmiths’ College, School of Art and Design. His work has exhibited at Cleveland Museum of Art; Milwaukee Art Museum; Wuk Kunsthalle, Vienna; and Magyar Fotogr’fiai M’zeum Kesckem’t, Hungary. His work is held in the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art; Fine Arts Library, Indiana University, IN; Impressions Gallery, North Yorkshire; The Rooms Corporation of Newfoundland and Labrador. He is represented by James Baird Gallery.

Jaclyn Silverman   Jenn and Joel   Blue Rubytype 2018

Jaclyn Silverman
Jenn and Joel
Blue Rubytype
2018

Jaclyn Silverman is from Youngstown, Ohio, living in Chicago, Illinois. She received her BFA in Photography from The Ohio State University, and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work revolves around community, place, and intergenerational histories. She has exhibited in Boulder, CO, Chicago, IL, Youngstown, and Columbus, Ohio. She has been the recipient of the Denman Research Grant from The Ohio State University and Women Artists Against Racism from the YWCA for her ongoing series, The Working Family. Her works are part of permanent collections with The Ohio State University, The Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection, and The Art Institute of Chicago. She and Robert Clarke-Davis curated the exhibition Within the Portfolios: 1968-2016 A History of Photography from the School of the Art Institute with the Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection. Silverman has been a visiting lecturer with The Ohio State University and Part-time Professor at Dominican University in River Forest, IL. Currently, she is Professor of Art and Humanities with Truman College, Artistic Director of Chicago art organization, CPS Lives, and returning faculty member with Ox-Bow School of Art.

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A Body in Motion
Jul
28
to Aug 3

A Body in Motion

A Body in Motion
Helen Lee
1 week course || GLASS 647 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee: $150

This technical course will establish a firm foundation in glassblowing skills, emphasizing a detailed understanding of how to use one’s body to work with this changing state of matter. This course will bring to light common bad habits and poor physical practices common to glassblowing. Nontraditional methods of understanding movement and proprioception in the hot glass studio will be employed, including video analysis apps and audio-augmented tools. Reference will be made to Nicolás Salazar Sutil’s text Motion and Representation: The Language of Human Movement, movement models as illustrated by Oskar Schlemmer and The B-Team’s glass choreography. Through daily demonstrations, drills, and practice time, students can expect to move swiftly through a basic introduction or review of hot glass, with acute attention paid to the underpinnings of common pitfalls. Over the course of the week, students will produce basic blown forms with increasing proficiency and efficiency. 


FACULTY

Helen Lee   Alphabit   Glass murrine, Low-Iron Float Glass, Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Acrylic, LEDs 36” x 18” x 48” 2018

Helen Lee
Alphabit
Glass murrine, Low-Iron Float Glass,
Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Acrylic, LEDs
36” x 18” x 48”
2018

Helen Lee is an artist, designer, educator, and glassblower. Her work utilizes the amorphous properties of glass to speak to the changing nature of language—through form, over time, and across cultures. She holds an MFA in Glass from the Rhode Island School of Design and a BSAD in Architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her work is in the collections of the Minnesota Museum of American Art, the Corning Museum of Glass, the Chrysler Museum Glass Studio, and Toyama City Institute of Glass Art. Her recent exhibitions include Em Space Engram (Watrous Gallery, Madison, WI), and Carried on Both Sides (Knockdown Center, Maspeth, NY). She is currently an Assistant Professor and Head of Glass in the Art Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

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Multi-Level Painting: Form, Process and Meaning
Jul
28
to Aug 10

Multi-Level Painting: Form, Process and Meaning

Multilevel Painting: Form, Process and Meaning 
Nazafarin Lotfi and Erin Washington
2 week course || PAINTING 605 001 || 3 credit hours || Lab Fee: $50

This course for beginning to advanced students will include extensive experimentation with materials and techniques through individual painting problems. Emphasis will be placed on active decision-making to explore formal and material options as part of the painting process in relation to form and meaning. Students will pursue various interests in subject matter. Students may choose to work with oil-based media. Demonstrations, lectures and critiques will be included.


FACULTY

Erin Washington   Tempest   acrylic, colored pencil, graphite, high-polymer fil lead on panel 20" x 24" 2018

Erin Washington
Tempest
acrylic, colored pencil, graphite, high-polymer fil lead on panel
20" x 24"
2018

Erin Washington is a Painter, Drawer, and Installation artist currently living and working in Chicago. Using fugitive and symbolic materials (ashes, blackberries, bones, chalk, moss, and spaceblankets), Washington’s works source imagery from the Sciences, Mythology, and Art History that represent ruptures and failures in the search for meaning and truth. Colors fade or pigments are burned: the objects emulate the cycles they describe. The artist’s actions and products are in a constant state of flux, highlighting the disharmony between meaning, beauty, and a fundamentally messy universe. However, the relative temporality of the work’s making counters ambivalence; the immediate process and present-ness the work demands eclipses uncertainty... for the moment. Erin is currently a lecturer in the Painting and Drawing Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she received her MFA in 2011. Notable solo exhibitions have been held at such venues as Illinois State University, The Riverside Art Center, Riverside Illinois and Zolla/Lieberman Gallery. Her work has also been included in group exhibitions at such spaces as Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago; Julius Caesar, Chicago; and Columbia University in New York. Washington’s upcoming exhibition at Cleve Carney Art Gallery in Glen Ellyn, IL is scheduled for Fall 2019.

Nazafarin Lotfi   From Borderlands   ongoing, graphite on postcard paper 2017

Nazafarin Lotfi
From Borderlands
ongoing, graphite on postcard paper
2017

Nazafarin Lotfi received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2011 and her BA from the University of Tehran in 2007. Lotfi explores the phenomenology of spatial experience to investigate how self and place relate to and define each other. In the context of collective histories and memories, she examines the subjectivity of the politicized individual. Recent solo exhibitions include: Become Ocean, Soon.tw, Montreal, CA; Negative Capability, Regards, Chicago, IL; Poiesis, Fernwey Gallery, Chicago, IL; White Light, Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago, IL; Love at Last Sight, Brand New Gallery, Milan, Italy; Circles, Tony Wight Gallery, Chicago, IL. Recent group shows include: Waving, Unisex Salon, Brooklyn, NY; This here, Regards, Chicago, IL; Elsewhere, Joseph Gross Gallery, Tucson, AZ; Sedentary Fragmentation, Heaven Gallery, Chicago, IL; Resonant Objects, Logan Center Exhibitions, Chicago, IL; among others. In 2015-2016, Lotfi was awarded an artist residency at the Department of Arts and Public Life at the University of Chicago.

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Wet-plate and Platinotypes - 1 week Session 2
Aug
4
to Aug 10

Wet-plate and Platinotypes - 1 week Session 2

Wet-plate and Platinotypes
Robert Clarke-Davis and Jaclyn Silverman
PHOTO 610 002 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee $150

Using the historic, time-honored wet-plate collodion and platinotype processes students will move between the studio, community, and natural environment at Ox-Bow to create images and photographic objects. These courses can be taken sequentially for two weeks or individually for one week. The first week will focus on wet-plate collodion; students will explore the fundamentals of large format photography using analog view cameras to create glass-plate negatives in the field. Mobile, onsite darkrooms will allow instant gauging in progress and results. Glass plates can stand alone as photographic objects, or be reproduced in photographic printing. During week two students will work with platinotype printing, one of the most stable photographic processes. Students will use the traditional iron-based developing-out process of platinum palladium. Using digital cameras and laptops to capture images, they will digitally print negatives to be used in this unique tactile process. Those who participate in wet-plate collodion will be able to print directly from their glass plate negatives.


FACULTY

Robert Clarke-Davis   Untitled   2018

Robert Clarke-Davis
Untitled
2018

Robert Clarke-Davis has served as an Associate Professor in Photography at SAIC since 1990. He earned his BA from Beloit College and an MA at the University of London, Goldsmiths’ College, School of Art and Design. His work has exhibited at Cleveland Museum of Art; Milwaukee Art Museum; Wuk Kunsthalle, Vienna; and Magyar Fotogr’fiai M’zeum Kesckem’t, Hungary. His work is held in the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art; Fine Arts Library, Indiana University, IN; Impressions Gallery, North Yorkshire; The Rooms Corporation of Newfoundland and Labrador. He is represented by James Baird Gallery.

Jaclyn Silverman   Jenn and Joel   Blue Rubytype 2018

Jaclyn Silverman
Jenn and Joel
Blue Rubytype
2018

Jaclyn Silverman is from Youngstown, Ohio, living in Chicago, Illinois. She received her BFA in Photography from The Ohio State University, and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work revolves around community, place, and intergenerational histories. She has exhibited in Boulder, CO, Chicago, IL, Youngstown, and Columbus, Ohio. She has been the recipient of the Denman Research Grant from The Ohio State University and Women Artists Against Racism from the YWCA for her ongoing series, The Working Family. Her works are part of permanent collections with The Ohio State University, The Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection, and The Art Institute of Chicago. She and Robert Clarke-Davis curated the exhibition Within the Portfolios: 1968-2016 A History of Photography from the School of the Art Institute with the Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection. Silverman has been a visiting lecturer with The Ohio State University and Part-time Professor at Dominican University in River Forest, IL. Currently, she is Professor of Art and Humanities with Truman College, Artistic Director of Chicago art organization, CPS Lives, and returning faculty member with Ox-Bow School of Art.

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Lithography: Stone and Photolithography - 1 week, Session 2
Aug
4
to Aug 10

Lithography: Stone and Photolithography - 1 week, Session 2

Lithography: Stone and Photolithography
Danny Miller 
PRINT 635 002 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee $50

This fast-paced course is designed for both beginners and advanced artists, and will be offered in a two-week sequence. Week one focuses on traditional methods with stone lithography, and week two introduces students to photomechanical lithography using both hand-drawn and digital processes.  Students are encouraged to investigate personal directions in their work as they explore lithographic possibilities through editions and unique variants.  Emphasis will be placed on both conceptual and technical development, and additional demonstrations will be added based on the specific interests and needs of the participants.  Class consists of demonstrations, presentations, work time, discussions, and critiques.  Historical and contemporary lithographic examples will be presented in order to clarify the relationships between idea, context, material, and process.


FACULTY

Danny Miller   humdrum   woodcut, 10.5”w x 11.5”h 2016

Danny Miller
humdrum
woodcut, 10.5”w x 11.5”h
2016

Danny Miller is an artist and musician working in Chicago, IL.  Utilizing woodblock, lithographic printing and drawing, he conjures works inspired by science fiction pulp covers, Victorian engravings, advertisements, comic books and music. Miller has taught at Ohio State University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, SAIC and Ox-Bow School of Art and has been the Printmedia Department Manager at SAIC for 30 years. He received his MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has worked in professional print shops including Landfall Press, Normal Editions Workshop and Four Brothers Press, in addition to playing and teaching traditional fiddle and banjo music at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago.

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Multi–Level Glass
Aug
4
to Aug 10

Multi–Level Glass

Multi–Level Glass
Leo Tecosky
1 week course|| GLASS 641 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee: $150

A hands-on studio workshop for those with some glassblowing experience. Students will learn a variety of techniques for manipulating molten “hot glass” into vessel or sculptural forms.  Lectures, demonstrations, videos, and critiques will augment studio instruction.

FACULTY

Leo Tecosky   Artifactual   glass: blown, hot sculpted, sandblasted 7”x 20” x 4” Photo Credit: Nathan J Shaulis

Leo Tecosky
Artifactual
glass: blown, hot sculpted, sandblasted
7”x 20” x 4”
Photo Credit: Nathan J Shaulis

Leo Tecosky’s work is a mashup of art x craft x design. Combining traditional glassblowing techniques, graffiti, stylized typography, and Islamic geometric motifs, he creates new objects that do not conform to any one discipline. With a  BA in Fine Art from Alfred University and an MFA from The School of Visual Arts in Manhattan, Tecosky teaches at studios and universities both nationally and internationally. Leo lives and works in Brooklyn, NY, blowing glass and maintaining a studio practice.

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Fungi: Making and Learning
Aug
11
to Aug 17

Fungi: Making and Learning

Fungi: Making and Learning
Christopher Lee Kennedy
1 week course || DRAWING 623 001 || 1 credit hour

This class explores the use of mycology, performance art, and movement research to develop artworks in collaboration with a landscape. Through a series of immersive encounters with Ox-Bow’s 115 + acre campus, students will experiment with practices such as embodied science, chance operation, and the development of movement scores to create ecologically-inspired artworks. Students will experiment with a range of media including field recording, drawing and experimental choreography. Class materials and exercises will draw inspiration from the life and work of John Cage who was not only an experimental Fluxus artist, but also an avid mushroom hunter and co-founder of the New York Mycological Society. While an introduction to mushroom identification and foraging will be discussed, the class will also focus on how mushrooms can serve as a metaphor and material for multispecies collaboration and reflective art practices. Studio work and research will ultimately result in new movement-based works, drawings and field research.


FACULTY

Christopher Lee Kennedy   Mycoramblings   microphone, field recorder, mushrooms 2016

Christopher Lee Kennedy
Mycoramblings
microphone, field recorder, mushrooms
2016

Christopher Lee Kennedy is an educator and artist based in Brooklyn, New York. With a background in environmental engineering, Kennedy playfully re-imagines field science techniques and develops new forms of storytelling to create installations, sculptures, and publications that examine conventional notions of ‘Nature’ and the possibility of interspecies collaboration. Kennedy has shown work at the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts, the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, the Ackland Art Museum and the Queens Museum. He is currently a part time Faculty in the Department of Art and Design History and Theory at Parsons School of Design.

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Following a Blue Thread
Aug
11
to Aug 17

Following a Blue Thread

Following a Blue Thread
Sonja Dahl
1 week course || FIBER 618 001 || 1 credit hour || Lab Fee: $50

To love indigo is no innocent thing. This course, while focused on technical aspects of working with indigo dye, also takes into account the complexities inherent to historical and contemporary infatuation with the dye, specifically within its American trajectory from colonial plantation crop to current fetishization in popular culture. The students will be asked to approach their work with the dye from a critical standpoint, thinking not only about its alchemical and transformative mysteries, but also as a social-political substance, rich in semiotic potential. This class will depart from culturally specific approaches to surface design with indigo like batik and shibori, and instead utilize indigo through experimental, performative, and conceptually-driven means and materials.


FACULTY

Sonja Dahl   Colonial Glory   |synthetic indigo dye, rice 96” x 96” x .25 2016

Sonja Dahl
Colonial Glory
|synthetic indigo dye, rice
96” x 96” x .25
2016

Sonja Dahl is an artist, writer, and Research Associate in the Department of Art at the University of Oregon, Eugene. She received her MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 2012 and subsequently spent several years making research and collaborative projects in Indonesia with support from the Fulbright Foundation and the Asian Cultural Council. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles; Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; Darwin Visual Arts Association, Australia; and Bezirksmuseum Neubau, Vienna. Her writing is published in both peer-reviewed journals and print-based and online arts publications, including PARSE Journal, Textile: the Journal of Cloth and Culture, and Surface Design Journal. Dahl lectures widely and has attended residencies at Ox-Bow, Caldera, Summer Forum, and ACRE, among others. www.sonjakdahl.com

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Color
Aug
11
to Aug 17

Color

Color
Jo Hormuth
1 week course || PAINTING 655 001 || 1 credit hour

This course investigates a series of color problems to sensitize students to the interaction of color and color phenomena. Considering the problems of color use and color composition, the course emphasizes hue, value, and chroma and the application of such knowledge to the visual arts. A basic course for all disciplines in seeing and using color.


FACULTY

Jo Hormuth   Better Grammar-Garden (detail)   Lambda pigment printed photographs, face-mounted to clear acrylic, individually laser cut and mounted to 1/2” clear acrylic Suite of 8 works 2015-2017

Jo Hormuth
Better Grammar-Garden (detail)
Lambda pigment printed photographs, face-mounted to clear acrylic, individually laser cut and mounted to 1/2” clear acrylic
Suite of 8 works
2015-2017

Jo Hormuth is a multidisciplinary artist whose ideas spring from a fascination with perceptual, cognitive, and linguistic contradictions, backed by research into the architecture, history, and material conditions of the situation in which a work will be developed and shown. Her latest public project is Better Grammar–Garden, for the Chicago Botanic Garden. The eight large color compositions form a portrait of the garden—itself an abstraction—from monochrome macro photographs of plants taken over the course of a year. As founder of Chicago Architectural Arts, she focuses on the restoration of significant interiors; most recently, she researched and recreated interior finishes for the Darwin Martin House, Frank Lloyd Wright’s largest Prairie-style complex, and worked on the restoration of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s Willow Tea Rooms in Glasgow. Hormuth is represented by Kusseneers Gallery, Brussels.

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Relief Print to Book Art
Aug
11
to Aug 17

Relief Print to Book Art

Relief Print to Book Art
Jeanine Coupe Ryding and Myungah Hyon
1 week course || PRINT 650 001 || 1 credit hours || Lab Fee: $50

Participants will learn to carve and print wood block narratives that are bound into book forms. Using the relief print and some writing, participants will learn single sheet, saddle stitch, perfect and accordion style bookbinding. The binding style of each book is considered with regard to the content it is presenting. Through examples and demonstrations students will learn about papers, using the tools of relief printmaking, as well as tools and materials of bookbinding. Emphasis is on content, self expression, and acquiring skills. No prior experience necessary, writers welcome.


FACULTY

Jeanine Coupe Ryding   Night Swim   woodcut print on Korean Hanji paper 2018

Jeanine Coupe Ryding
Night Swim
woodcut print on Korean Hanji paper
2018

Jeanine Coupe Ryding’s prints and artists books are in museum and private collections in the U.S, Europe and Japan. Her work focuses primarily on woodcut prints, etchings, artist’s books, drawing, and collage. She founded both Shadow Press and Press 928 in Evanston, Illinois for fine art printing and publishing. She received her BA degree from The University of Iowa and her MFA from the Universitat der Kunste, in Berlin, Germany. Jeanine has received various awards and residencies including Illinois Arts Council Award, Arts Midwest Grant, Frans Masereel Center residency in Belgium and Anchor Graphics residency in Chicago. She has been teaching in the Printmedia Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago since 1991.

 
Myungah Hyon   Connection   phone books, wood, PVA glue 2018

Myungah Hyon
Connection
phone books, wood, PVA glue
2018

Myungah Hyon is an Adjunct Associate Professor in Printmedia at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She earned her BFA from the Ontario College Of Arts and Design and MFA from SAIC. She has exhibited at Printed Matter Inc., NY; Kookmin Art Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Gallery Factory, Seoul, Korea; Riverside Art Center, Riverside, IL; William A. Koehnline Gallery, Des Plaines, IL; Elmhurst Art Museum, IL; Artemisia Gallery, Chicago, IL; Gallery 312, Chicago, IL and earned awards from The Community Artist Assistant Program, City of Chicago; Seoul Foundation for Arts and Culture; and Arts Council Korea. Her most recent publication is titled Book Book, Dreamer FTY (Publisher).

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