Speculative Weaving
Aug
12
to Aug 18

Speculative Weaving

Marianne Fairbanks
FIBER 617 001
1 credit hour, 1 week
Lab Fee $50

Weaving has often been associated with themes of time, rhythm, meditation, and materiality and for this course we weave small studies in response to these prompts. Students will be encouraged to consider the act of weaving as an end in itself, conceptualizing process, while also learning technical skills including tablet, inkle and finger weaving along with pattern drafting. Woven studies will be developed on small portable looms and from there students will consider how they might invent new loom structures, weave into site-specific locations and create interactive projects. Concepts and theories will be introduced through readings, slide presentations and discussions that will provide the direction and inspiration for each student to develop their own inquiries and inventions.


FACULTY

- Marianne Fairbanks -

  Marianne Fairbanks   Tapestry Machine 1 (pink),  2017 polyester thread, yarn, plumbing line, reflective thread, invisible warp, fabric

Marianne Fairbanks
Tapestry Machine 1 (pink), 2017
polyester thread, yarn, plumbing line, reflective thread, invisible warp, fabric

Marianne Fairbanks is an Assistant Pofessor in the Design Studies department at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  She received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her BFA from the University of Michigan.  Her work has been shown nationally and internationally in venues including the Museum of Art and Design, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Smart Museum of Art and Museum London in Ontario. Her current work is focused on the intersections of social practice, weaving, mathematics, and technology. mariannefairbanks.com and weavinglab.com.

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Image in Enamel
Aug
12
to Aug 18

Image in Enamel

Veleta Vancza
SCULPT 645 001
Lab Fee $50

In this course students learn the basics of copper enameling (fusing glass to copper) and explore the potential of enamel decals. We cover basic enameling techniques such as sifting and explore sophisticated decal techniques. Students create their own decals on campus using laser printed images as well as experiment with decals that are commercially available. Lectures on the histories and applications of this technique augment work in the studio. Group and individual discussions address technical issues of this process and troubleshoot how to incorprate these elements into a completed artwork. This course is for all levels of students. No prior metals or enamel experience is necessary.


FACULTY

- Veleta Vancza -

Veleta Vancza has been working as an artist for almost 30 years. She began her career as an art/studio jeweler creating one-of-a-kind conceptual works. More recently she has been working on a larger scale creating sculpture, wall pieces, and installations using vitreous enamel on metal integrated with new technologies such as sound-mapping, and 3D rendering software. She is recognized for her experimental use of vitreous enamel as an adhesive, as well as her innovations with phosphorescent enamels. Veleta is also the co-founder and Creative Director for Mina Atramentum, makers of Mine Luxury Nail Lacquer www.minelacquer.com, and holds a patent for her research in suspension-based coatings with precious metals & gemstones. Her innovative approach to packaging design has earned her worldwide recognition, and was a finalist for a Clio Image award in 2014. Veleta’s work has been exhibited internationally in venues such as the Museum of Arts & Design (NYC), the Design Museum (Helsinki), the Cheugju International Craft Biennale,and Museum fur Angewandte Kunst. Many of her works have been featured in a variety of books and periodicals such as Sculpture Magazine, Metalsmith Magazine, Marie Claire, WWD Japan, The Boston Globe, 500 Enameled Objects and The Art of Enameling: Techniques, Projects, Inspiration. Her works can be found in the permanent collections of the Kohler Company and the Museum of Arts & Design as well as numerous private collections. Veleta is currently a Professional Lecturer in the Fashion Department at Marist College.

  Veleta Vancza   color pile #5 , 2002 Copper, vitreous enamel

Veleta Vancza
color pile #5, 2002
Copper, vitreous enamel

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FACES!: Portraiture and the Expanded Subject 
Aug
12
to Aug 18

FACES!: Portraiture and the Expanded Subject 

Ruby T
Painting 652 001
1 credit hour, 1 week

What does it mean to draw the face of a person, place, or idea? For centuries, portraiture has been used to record history and build intimacy. With the fundamentals of observational drawing as a starting point, this course explores the boundaries of portrait-making through experimentation with subject, medium, scale, and site. From human faces to car faces, to the faces of our ideas and emotions, we will stretch traditional notions of portraiture through expanded subject matter as well as material choices. Students will work with a range of wet and dry media, including charcoal, graphite, pen, and ink. Slide lectures and critiques will be included to offer additional insight into the history and possibilities of portraiture


Faculty

- Ruby T -

  Ruby T   TENSES zine excerpt,    2017 risograph on paper

Ruby T
TENSES zine excerpt, 2017
risograph on paper

Ruby T’s work is an experiment in translating fantasy to reality, and she is fueled by anger, desire, and magic. She investigates the stimulating, banal, and often infrastructural as sites of power and exchange: nightclubs, domestic appliances, broadcast news, sex. Ruby graduated in 2016 with an MFA from SAIC, and has shown work at Chicago venues including Roots & Culture, Iceberg Projects, Hyde Park Art Center, the Back Room at Kim’s Corner Foods, Ballroom Projects, ACRE, EXPO, Comfort Station, Roman Susan, Chicago Filmmakers, Chicago Alternative Comics Expo, Woman Made Gallery, and Plaines Project. rubyt.net

 

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Sumi-e: East Asian Brush Painting
Aug
12
to Aug 18

Sumi-e: East Asian Brush Painting

Qigu Jiang
Painting 639 001
1 credit hour, 1 week

This one-week course introduces the basics of the traditional Chinese and Japanese ink and brush stroke painting. Starting from learning tools and materials, the class concentrates on the basic skills and techniques that students could develop during the course. The philosophy of Zen behind the ink painting is introduced as well. In-class demonstrations are followed by painting, focusing on botanical subjects such as bamboo and other flowers. Birds and fish are introduced in late sessions. This course is especially appropriate for students interested in drawing and watercolor.


FACULTY

- Qigu Jiang -

Qigu Jiang is an ink painter, teaching painting and art history at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has also serveed as the director of The Research House for Asian Art since 2008. His exhibitions include the Rhode Island College; Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam; Duoyun Xuan Art Museum, Shanghai; Zhu Jizhan Art Museum; Yantai Art Museum; 99 Art Space Shanghai University Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in Stockholm; Xuhui Art Museum; Qingdao Art Museum; Qing Zhuo Museum; Koehhnline Museum; Walsh Gallery; Jan Cicero Gallery; Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale, FL; Osaka Triennial, Japan. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in Stockholm; Rothschild Investment Corp.; Telchar System Inc.; Swiss Bank Corp.; Prentiss Properties Corp. Texas; Euredit Co. Italy; Duolun Museum of Modern Art.

  Qigu Jiang   Landscape #A28,  2015. ink on rice paper

Qigu Jiang
Landscape #A28, 2015.
ink on rice paper

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Screen Printing: Marks, Stencils and Exposures
Aug
5
to Aug 11

Screen Printing: Marks, Stencils and Exposures

Nick Butcher and Mat Daly
PRINT 611 001
1 credit hour, 1 week
Lab Fee $50

In this course, students will acquire technical
proficiency in various hand and photographic stencil
printing methods. Individual exploration and development in the medium will be encouraged and supported by both individual instruction and group critiques. Emphasis will be placed on unique prints created by layering, stencil repositioning, and combining hand mark-making with photographic and found imagery. Collaboration will be encouraged.


FACULTY

- Nick Butcher -

  Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi   Untitled Monoprint , 2017 screen print

Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi
Untitled Monoprint, 2017
screen print

Nick Butcher is a Chicago-based artist and musician. Since 2006 he’s worked collaboratively with his partner Nadine Nakanishi under the name Sonnenzimmer. Initially recognized for their idiosyncratic commissioned screen printed posters, their practice has since morphed into an interdisciplinary toolshed spanning multiple platforms, including exhibitions, publishing, performance, and graphic design. Their collaborative practice is grounded in the lasting potential of the graphic arts, while exploring the physical and conceptual friction between abstraction and communication. As a solo artist, Nick continues to record and perform music under his own name and the joke DJ name Jan Jammerlappen.

 

  Mat Daly   Fira 1,  2013 silk screened monoprint on panel

Mat Daly
Fira 1, 2013
silk screened monoprint on panel

- Mat Daly -

Mat Daly (b. 1974) is an artist living and working in Saugatuck, MI. In the past decade Mat’s screen printed posters have become a mainstay of the Chicago indie music, art, and craft scenes as well as covering the walls (indeed maybe bathroom walls) of rock clubs, record stores and galleries across the US and abroad. In addition to being the principal poster designer for the nationally acclaimed Renegade Craft Fair, Mat’s past clients range from The MoMA to The Hideout. Mat’s screen printed work regularly traverses the natural landscape filtered through the distorting lens of memory.

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Organize Your Own
Jul
29
to Aug 11

Organize Your Own

Daniel Tucker and Dan S. Wang
PRINT 653 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks

This course grows out of the 2016 exhibition Organize Your Own curated by Daniel Tucker. The exhibition took as its premise Stokely Carmichael’s fifty-year-old directive to go “organize your own” and featured contributions from forty-plus performers, artists, and writers, including co-instructor Dan S. Wang. Through a mix of curated texts and screenings and open studio production, students will grapple with the controversies and challenges of aesthetically complex political engagement in the era of Trump. Topics covered will range from activist documentation to slogan composition, from phone banking to scenario planning, from theoretical reflection to real-world intervention. Studio assignments will include printmaking, collage, documentary photography, and creative writing. Prompts will be provided while also leaving room for medium-specific and thematic concerns of the students. Finally, skill-based workshops drawing from the traditions of community organizing will be integrated into the course while maintaining a strong focus on the specific contributions that artists and designers can make to urgent discussions about new collectivity and social difference.
 


FACULTY

Daniel Tucker

  Daniel Tucker   Organize Your Own   opening night performance by Jenn Kidwell and Thomas Graves as part of an exhibition curated by Daniel Tucker. Photo by Paul Gargagliano 

Daniel Tucker
Organize Your Own
opening night performance by Jenn Kidwell and Thomas Graves as part of an
exhibition curated by Daniel Tucker.
Photo by Paul Gargagliano 

Daniel Tucker works as an artist, writer and organizer developing documentaries, publications, exhibitions and events inspired by his interest in social movements and the people and places from which they emerge. His writings and lectures on the intersections of art and politics and his collaborative art projects have been published and presented widely. He has a longstanding interest in Chicago and co-founded AREA Chicago magazine, Never The Same oral history and archive, and edited the book Immersive Life Practices as part of the Chicago Social Practice History series developed by SAIC’s Department of Exhibitions & Exhibition Studies. He earned his MFA from University of Illinois at Chicago and BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is an Assistant Professor and founding Graduate Program Director in Socially-Engaged Art at Moore College of Art & Design in Philadelphia. miscprojects.com.
 

- Dan S. Wang -

  Dan S. Wang   Primes: Nineteen In Thirteen In 1973 , 2016 suite of nineteen drawings, ballpoint pen on junk mail

Dan S. Wang
Primes: Nineteen In Thirteen In 1973, 2016
suite of nineteen drawings, ballpoint pen on junk mail

Dan S. Wang is an artist, letterpress printer, and writer excited to be co-teaching at Ox-Bow for his second time. Current projects include commissions from Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia and the Station Museum of Houston. His writings have been published internationally in journals, exhibition catalogues, and book collections. He has lectured widely, including at the Central Academy in Beijing, Documenta 11, and the third Creative Time Summit. He was a co-founder of the experimental project space Mess Hall in Chicago in 2003. His collaborative writings include the 2016 conversation-essay The Social Practice That Is Race co-authored with Anthony Romero published by the artist run Wooden Leg Press, and the 2015 critical essay In the Back of the Beyond in Global Activism from MIT Press, co-authored with Sarah Lewison.

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Multi-Level Foundry
Jul
29
to Aug 11

Multi-Level Foundry

Liz Ensz and Lloyd Mandelbaum
SCULPT 660 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks
Lab Fee $200

In this multi-level metal casting course, students will learn the fundamentals of pattern generation, simple and multi-part mold making techniques with sodium silicate bonded sand, casting with bronze, aluminum, and iron, and finishing and patination techniques for their castings. Explorations will be informed by the materiality of molten metal and molding processes, the history and technologies of metal casting, and discussion of cast metal sculpture in contemporary art. In the spirit of “there is no "I" in foundry,” teamwork and safe foundry practices form the foundation of the course. Students will be encouraged to experiment and respond to the natural environment with patterns made at Ox-Bow in an open-air sculpture studio.


FACULTY

- Liz Ensz -

  Liz Ensz   E Pluribus Unum,  2014, cast pre-Reagan pennies

Liz Ensz
E Pluribus Unum, 2014,
cast pre-Reagan pennies

Liz Ensz was born in Minnesota to a resourceful family of penny-savers, metal scrappers, and curators of cast-offs. She received her BFA in Fiber from the Maryland Institute College of Art and her MFA in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Ensz has exhibited her textiles and sculpture nationwide, has been awarded residencies at The John Michael Kohler Arts/Industry Program in Foundry, Sheboygan, WI; Salem Art Works, Salem, NY: Playa, Summer Lake, OR; LATITUDE, Chicago, IL; and Blue Mountain Center, Blue Mountain Lake, NY; and has been the recipient of a City of Chicago DCASE Individual Artist Grant, The Creative Baltimore Fund Grant, The Gilroy Roberts Fellowship for Engraving, and The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Travel Fellowship. With an interdisciplinary approach, her work presents a comparative study of the mass-cultural investment in disposability and the human desire to imagine permanence through emblems, monuments, and commemoration.

- Lloyd Mandelbaum -

  Lloyd Mandelbaum   lunge   cast iron

Lloyd Mandelbaum
lunge
cast iron

Lloyd Mandelbaum is a sculptor and entrepreneur currently residing in Hamilton, MI. Lloyd is the owner and operator of Chicago Crucible fine art foundry. He casts bronze, aluminum, and iron for artist and designers as well as in his own sculptural practice using a diverse array of techniques. After earning a BFA in sculpture from SAIC, Lloyd gained experience working in arts foundries before founding Chicago Crucible in 2009.  His appreciation for the craft has also led him to design and build foundries across the country and in Mexico to better enable the art-making process, as well as produce foundry equipment commercially.

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The Object in Context
Jul
29
to Aug 11

The Object in Context

Anders Ruhwald & Marie Hermann
CER 631 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks
Lab Fee $150

This course will focus on ceramic object making. The word “object” has been specifically chosen, as it is neutral to the divide between the utilitarian tool and the sculptural form. In this class we will view these categories as a continuum to see how these ideas may inform one another. Central to this will be a discussion of how objects relate to each other and the possible sites in which they exists such as home, gallery, or landscape. Each session will have presentations, discussions, technical demonstrations, and critiques integrated into a focused, process-based studio experience.


FACULTY

- Marie Herwald Hermann -

  Marie Herwald Hermann   shields and the parergon of time,  2017 ceramic and silicone

Marie Herwald Hermann
shields and the parergon of time, 2017
ceramic and silicone

Marie Herwald Hermann (born 1979, Copenhagen, Denmark) lives and works in Detroit. She received her MFA from Royal College of Art in London in 2009. Solo exhibitions: include Shields and Parergons, Reyes Projects;  And dusk turned dawn, Blackthorn, NADA Miami; Northern Light, Pontiac Rise at Galerie Nec, Paris, France: A Gentle Blow to the Rock, Hong Kong. She has participated in group exhibitions in USA, Denmark, Italy, China, Sweden and Germany, including 99cents or less at MOCAD Detroit, and Another Look at Detroit: Parts 1 and 2 at Marianne Bosky Gallery. Her work is represented in the collections of The Danish Art Foundation, The Denver Art Museum, Servre Museum, Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum, Cranbrook Art Museum and yhe Jingdezhen Ceramic Art Museum. She was awarded the 2013 Kresge Artist Fellowship and the Danish Art Foundation Grant in 2016. She is currently a Visiting Artist at SAIC.

- Anders Herwald Ruhwald -

  Anders Herwald Ruhwald   Weather Thinker,  2017 glazed earthenware

Anders Herwald Ruhwald
Weather Thinker, 2017
glazed earthenware

Anders Herwald Ruhwald (born 1974, Denmark) lives and works in Detroit, He graduated from the Royal College of Art in London in 2005. Ruhwald has had more than 20 solo exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world including MOCA Cleveland, OH, MIMA, The Museum of Art and Design, and the Cranbrook Art Museum. His work has been shown in more than 80 group shows at venues like Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, Pinakotek der Moderne, Taipei Yingge Museum, and Kunsthal Charlottenborg. His work is represented in over 20 public museum collections including The Victoria and Albert Museum, The Denver Art Museum, The Detroit Institute of Art, Musée des Arts Décoratifs,The Museum of Art and Design in 2011 he was awarded the Gold Prize at the Icheon International Biennial in South Korea. He also received the Sotheby’s Prize at the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2007.

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Experiments in Glassblowing
Jul
29
to Aug 11

Experiments in Glassblowing

Deborah Adler
GLASS 616 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks
Lab Fee: $300

This class is intended for multi-level glass students who wish to broaden their scope of this versatile medium. Students will be asked to refine their technical abilities in order to more clearly convey their artistic pursuits. The class will begin by covering basic glass blowing techniques.  Through skill building exercises the class will learn to work as a team on large-scale projects.  Students will be encouraged to learn, but not take too seriously, the traditional aspects of this process. There will be an emphasis on incorporating other materials both through the glass blowing process and in the finished product.


FACULTY

- Deborah Adler -

  Deborah Adler   Pom-Pom,  2015 blown glass

Deborah Adler
Pom-Pom, 2015
blown glass

Deborah’s career as a glassblower spans nearly two decades. Of that time, 15 years were spent in New York City working from the studios of UrbanGlass and GlassRoots.  She has developed several bodies of work and exhibited them at SOFA Chicago and New York, nationally in numerous galleries, and craft shows. Deborah was also lead gaffer on teams fabricating work for prominent contemporary lighting designers.  In 2015, Deborah left New York and relocated to Seattle, where she currently works as an artist assistant, while remaining focused on the design and production of her own work. She enjoys drinking coffee with friends, eating sushi, being silly, and going to the gym.

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Relief Print to Book Art
Jul
29
to Aug 4

Relief Print to Book Art

Jeanine Coupe Ryding and Myungah Hyon
PRINT 650 001
1 credit hour, 1 week
Lab Fee $50

Participants will learn to carve and print wood block narratives that are bound into book forms. Using the relief print and some writing, participants will learn single sheet, saddle stitch, perfect and accordion style bookbinding. The binding style of each book is considered with regard to the content it is presenting. Through examples and demonstrations students will learn about papers, using the tools of relief printmaking, as well as tools and materials of bookbinding. Emphasis is on content, self expression, and acquiring skills. No prior experience necessary, writers welcome.


FACULTY

Resting.1. 2017.jpg

- Jeanine Coupe Ryding -

Jeanine Coupe Ryding’s work has been shown throughout the U.S. and abroad and her prints and artists books are in multiple museum collections. She focuses primarily on woodcut prints, etchings, artist’s books, drawing and collage, and has founded both Shadow Press and Press 928 in Evanston, Illinois for artist’s books publishing. She received her BA from The University of Iowa and her MFA from Universitat der Kunste, Berlin, Germany. She has received various awards and residencies including Illinois Arts Council Award, Arts Midwest, Frans Masereel Center in Belgium, Roger Brown in Michigan and Anchor Graphics in Chicago. Her work is represented by Atrium Gallery in St. Louis, Olson Larsen Gallery in Des Moines and August Art in London. She has been teaching Printmedia at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago since 1991.

 

- Myungah Hyon - 

Myungah Hyon is an Adjunct Associate Professor in Printmedia at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She earned her BFA from the Ontario College Of Arts and Design and MFA from SAIC. She has exhibited at Printed Matter Inc., NY; Kookmin Art Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Gallery Factory, Seoul, Korea; Riverside Art Center, Riverside, IL; William A. Koehnline Gallery, Des Plaines, IL; Elmhurst Art Museum, IL; Artemisia Gallery, Chicago, IL; Gallery 312, Chicago, IL and earned awards from Community Artist Assistant Program, City of Chicago; Seoul Foundation for Arts and Culture; and Arts Council Korea. www.myungahhyonart.com

  Myungah Hyon   Connecting ,  2008 porcelain, offset print

Myungah Hyon
Connecting , 2008
porcelain, offset print

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Multi-Level Painting: Process, Form, and Meaning
Jul
29
to Aug 11

Multi-Level Painting: Process, Form, and Meaning

Josh Reames and Siebren Versteeg
PAINTING 605 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks

This course for beginning to advanced students will include extensive experimentation with materials and techniques through individual painting problems. Emphasis will be placed on active decision-making to explore formal and material options as part of the painting process in relation to form and meaning. Students will pursue various interests in subject matter. Students may choose to work with oil-based media. Demonstrations, lectures and critiques will be included.


FACULTY

- Josh Reames -

  Josh Reames   cycles , 2017 acrylic on canvas

Josh Reames
cycles, 2017
acrylic on canvas

Josh Reames (born 1985, Dallas, TX) received an MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago and a BFA from University of North Texas. He has presented his work at Andrea Rosen Gallery, Jacob Lewis Gallery, The Hole, Josh Lilley Gallery, Andrew Rafacz, Bill Brady Gallery, LVL3, Johannes Vogt, Monya Rowe Gallery, and the Urban Institute for Contemporary Art; at Brand New Gallery, Galeria Annaruma, and Dittrich & Schlechtriem. Reames’ work has been featured in Artillery, Artcritical, Hyperallergic, Artnews, New American Paintings, and Artslant. Reames currently lives and works in New York.

 

- Siebren Versteeg -

Siebren Versteeg was born about 17k days ago in New Haven. He has studied at School of Visual Arts in New York, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, University of Illinois at Chicago and Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Solo exhibitions include The Museum of Art at Rhode Island School of Design; Hallwalls, Buffalo, NY; The Art Institute of Boston; the Wexner Center for the Arts, Ohio; Max Protetch, New York; Rhona Hoffman Gallery and The Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. His work has been exhibited in group shows at Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC; ESSL Museum, Vienna; Contemporary Museum, Baltimore; Henry Art Gallery, Seattle; Krannert Art Museum, Illinois; the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia; and the National Museum of Art, Czech Republic. Versteeg’s work can be found in public collections including the Guggenheim, NY; Albright-Knox, Buffalo; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, CT; Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C.; and MCA, Chicago. He lives and works in New York.

  Siebren Versteeg   Permanent Vacation,  2016  steel, concrete, Internet connected computer program output to 65” LCD

Siebren Versteeg
Permanent Vacation, 2016
steel, concrete, Internet connected computer program output to 65” LCD

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Lighting: Fixtures, Flashlights & Reflectors
Jul
22
to Jul 28

Lighting: Fixtures, Flashlights & Reflectors

Chris Buchakjian
SCULPT 658 001
1 credit hour, 1 week
Lab Fee $50

This experimental course will highlight materials and technologies of lighting and light fixture design. Through hands-on demonstrations and practical exercises students will investigate the different qualities of light and its varied relationships to space, as well as its relationships to viewers. Students will employ these principles to develop original light fixtures and/or light installations. Students will gain knowledge and competency in the use of light as a generative material in their studio practice, as well as comprehension of the effects of light on our perception of space and form.


FACULTY

- Chris Buchakjian -

Chris Buchakjian was born and raised in upstate New York. His current studio practice is concerned with the relationship between Light, Thing-ness, and Monumentality. Chris trained as a motion picture lighting designer specializing in remote location filming. He has had the privilege of leading lighting crews into caves, tombs and tunnels on five continents. In that time he has been tasked with creating original light fixtures for feature films and documentary television series. For over 15 years he has been working with light-artists to facilitate the creation of large-scale lighting installations. He enjoys the challenges and technical complexities that are unique to this vocation. His visual art has been exhibited as part of the annual Autumn Lights show in Los Angeles, Activate/Chicago, and at the A to Z West in Joshua Tree, California. Chris holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Filmmaking from Hofstra University and a Master’s Degree in Design from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

  Chris Buchakjian   Clock No. 2 , 2012 fluorescent light boxes

Chris Buchakjian
Clock No. 2, 2012
fluorescent light boxes

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Lithography: Photolithography
Jul
22
to Jul 28

Lithography: Photolithography

2 WEEKS JUL. 15 -28
OR 1 WEEK:
WEEK 1 JUL. 15-21
WEEK 2 JUL. 22- 28

Danny Miller and Kristina Paabus
PRINT 637 001/ 635 001 or 635 002
1 credit hour, 1 week, $50 Lab Fee
or 3 credit hours, 2 weeks, $100 Lab Fee

This fast-paced course is designed for both beginners and advanced artists, (and will be offered in a two-week sequence). Week one focuses on traditional methods with stone lithography, and week two introduces students to photomechanical lithography using both hand-drawn and digital processes. Students are encouraged to investigate personal directions in their work as they explore lithographic possibilities through editions and unique variants. Emphasis will be placed on both conceptual and technical development, and additional demonstrations will be added based on the specific interests and needs of the participants. Class consists of demonstrations, presentations, work time, discussions, and critiques. Historical and contemporary lithographic examples will be presented in order to clarify the relationships between idea, context, material, and process.


FACULTY

- Danny Miller -

Danny Miller is an artist and musician working in Chicago, IL. Utilizing woodblock, lithographic printing and drawing, he conjures works inspired by science fiction pulp covers, Victorian engravings, advertisements, comic books and music. Miller has taught at Ohio State University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, SAIC and Ox-Bow School of Art and has been the Printmedia Department Manager at SAIC for 29 years. He received his MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has worked in professional print shops including Landfall Press, Normal Editions Workshop and Four Brothers Press, in addition to playing and teaching traditional fiddle and banjo music at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago.
 

  Danny Miller   Untitled,  2016, lithograph

Danny Miller
Untitled, 2016, lithograph

  Kristina Paabus   Something to Believe In,  2015 screen print and digital plotter drawing on paper 

Kristina Paabus
Something to Believe In, 2015
screen print and digital plotter drawing on paper 

- Kristina Paabus -

Kristina Paabus earned her BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited her work throughout the U.S. and Europe, and recent exhibitions include NEO Geo at the Akron Art Museum, Belt and Road at The National Gallery of Bulgaria, and the grass is the same color over there at Gallery Metropol in Estonia. Paabus is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship for Installation Art in Estonia, the Grant Wood Fellowship in Printmaking at The University of Iowa, and the Southern Graphics Council International Guanlan Residency Award. Kristina has attended numerous artist residences such as ACRE, Ox-Bow, Women’s Studio Workshop, Emmanuel College, SÍM, MUHU A.I., Guanlan Original Printmaking Base, NCCA Kronstadt, and Anderson Ranch Art Center. Paabus is Associate Professor of Reproducible Media at Oberlin College.

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Wet-plate and Platinotypes
Jul
15
to Jul 28

Wet-plate and Platinotypes

2 WEEKS: July 15-28
OR ONE WEEK

WEEK 1: July 15-21
WEE 2: July 22-28

Robert Clarke Davis and Jaclyn Silverman
PHOTO 609 001, 3 credit hours, 2 weeks
Lab Fee $300
PHOTO 610 001, 1 credit hour, 1 week
Lab Fee $150
PHOTO 610 002, 1 credit hour,1 week
Lab Fee $150

Using the historic, time-honored wet-plate collodion and platinotype processes students will move between the studio, community, and natural environment at Ox-Bow to create images and photographic objects. These courses can be taken sequentially for two weeks or individually for one week. The first week will focus on wet-plate collodion; students will explore the fundamentals of large format photography using analog view cameras to create glass-plate negatives in the field. Mobile, onsite darkrooms will allow instant gauging in progress and results. Glass plates can stand alone as photographic objects, or be reproduced in photographic printing. During week two students will work with platinotype printing, one of the most stable photographic processes. Students will use the traditional iron-based developing-out process of platinum palladium. Using digital cameras and laptops to capture images, they will digitally print negatives to be used in this unique tactile process. Those who participate in wet-plate collodion will be able to print directly from their glass plate negatives.


FACULTY

- Jaclyn Silverman -

  Jaclyn Silverman   Abby and Grace,  2017 ambrotype

Jaclyn Silverman
Abby and Grace, 2017
ambrotype

Jaclyn Silverman is a photographer from Youngstown, Ohio, living in Chicago, Illinois. She received her BFA in Photography from The Ohio State University, and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her photographic work and research has been exhibited in Columbus, Ohio, Youngstown, Ohio, Chicago, Illinois, and Boulder, Colorado, and collected by the Ohio State University, The Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection, and The Art Institute of Chicago. Silverman has been a Visiting Lecturer at The Ohio State University and Part-time Professor at Dominican University. She is currently a Teaching Artist at the Marwen Institute in Chicago, Illinois and a returning faculty to Ox-Bow School of Art.
 

- Robert Clarke-Davis -

  woody point,  2005 platinotype

woody point, 2005
platinotype

Robert Clarke-Davis has served as an Associate Professor in Photography at SAIC since 1990. He earned his BA from Beloit College and an MA at the University of London, Goldsmiths’ College, School of Art and Design. His work has exhibited at Cleveland Museum of Art; Milwaukee Art Museum; Wuk Kunsthalle, Vienna; and Magyar Fotogr’fiai M’zeum Kesckem’t, Hungary. His work is held in the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art; Fine Arts Library, Indiana University, IN; Impressions Gallery, North Yorkshire; The Rooms Corporation of Newfoundland and Labrador. He is represented by James Baird Gallery.

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Generative Forms
Jul
15
to Jul 21

Generative Forms

Christopher Meerdo
SCULPT 657 001
1 credit hour, 1 Week
Lab Fee $100

This one week intensive course will introduce students to mold making and casting techniques as well as various approaches to applying surface treatments and imagery to sculpted objects. In addition to tutorials in painting, surface finishing and decoupage techniques, students will have the opportunity to learn to utilize hydro-printing, a process for layering digital imagery on 3-D forms. Typically used in industrial applications, water transfer printing will allow students to re-imagine their sculptures, rich with surface images. Through a variety of hands-on practica, we will consider both the origins of the objects that surround us and their inherent reproducibility. Students will select and create objects for casting and create reproductions with their new skills. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between form and surface, and the poetics of material composition and exterior/surface appearance.


FACULTY

- Christopher Meerdo -

  Christopher Meerdo ,  Hydroprinted sculpture sourced from MRI and SEM medical models from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.,  2016 ,  extruded polystyrene, hydrocal, plaster, hydroprint, acrylic gloss glaze

Christopher Meerdo, Hydroprinted sculpture sourced from MRI and SEM medical models from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services., 2016,
extruded polystyrene, hydrocal, plaster, hydroprint, acrylic gloss glaze

Christopher Meerdo is a Chicago-based artist who grew up in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and Lithuania. Meerdo’s work was recently featured in a year-long solo exhibition at the Mattress Factory Museum of Contemporary Art in Pittsburgh. He was an artist in residence at the SIM Program in Reykjavik, Iceland and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2013. Meerdo received his MFA in Photography from the University of Illinois at Chicago and currently teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Exgirlfriend, Berlin; The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL; Coco Hunday, Tampa, FL; Floating Museum, Chicago, IL; Cabinet Magazine, Brooklyn, NY; SIM Gallery, Reykjavik, Iceland; The National Gallery of Kosovo and a traveling exhibition in Birmingham and Leicester, UK..

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Beginning Glass - 2
Jul
15
to Jul 28

Beginning Glass - 2

Megan Biddle
GLASS 630 002
3 credit hours, 2 weeks
Lab Fee $300

This course offers hands-on glassblowing experience to the beginner. Participants learn a variety of techniques for manipulating molten “hot glass” into vessel or sculptural forms. Lectures, videos, demonstrations, and critiques will augment studio
instruction.


FACULTY

- Megan Biddle -

  Megan Biddle   The Weight of Waiting (detail) , 2015 slumped window glass

Megan Biddle
The Weight of Waiting (detail), 2015
slumped window glass

Megan Biddle is an interdisciplinary artist whose work orbits between sculpture, installation, drawing and video. Rooted in glass, she produces experiment and process driven work with an emphasis on materials and their distinct characteristics. As an observer of nature she responds to the elusive and subtle, reflecting on variations of time, cycles of growth and erosion. She has attended residencies at The Macdowell Colony, The Jentel Foundation, The Creative Glass Center of America, Sculpture Space, The Virginia Center for Creative Arts, Pilchuck Glass School, Northlands Creative Glass in Scotland and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. Her work was acquired into the American Embassy’s permanent collection in Riga, Latvia. She has taught at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts and Pilchuck Glass School and currently teaches in the Glass Program at the Tyler School of Art. She is an Assistant Director and member of Tiger Strikes Asteroid Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, where she lives and works.

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Materials and Processes: Woodfire
Jul
15
to Jul 28

Materials and Processes: Woodfire

Benjamin Lambert & Nathan Willever
CER 616 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks
Lab Fee $150

This multi-level ceramics course will incorporate wheel thrown and hand built vessels and objects to be fired in both a high temperature stoneware gas kiln and in Ox-Bow’s single chambered catenary style wood kiln that was built in 2005. The first part of the course will be making individual work and firing the gas kiln with the second part being a collaborative effort in loading, firing, and unloading the work in the wood kiln. Discussions, critiques, and slide lectures will be included.


FACULTY

- Benjamin Lambert -

  Benjamin Lambert   False Sense of Security,  2016 earthenware, engobe, slip, underglaze, glaze

Benjamin Lambert
False Sense of Security, 2016
earthenware, engobe, slip, underglaze, glaze

Benjamin is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Design at Alma College in Alma, Michigan. He grew up in the small, rural town of Greene, Maine, spending time exploring the woods and rivers around his home. In 2008, he received a BFA with a concentration in ceramics from the University of Southern Maine. Between schooling, he maintained an active studio practice in Portland, Maine.  In 2010, he worked as a summer staff member at Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, in Newcastle, Maine.  He completed an MFA in Ceramics and Sculpture at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro, PA in 2015. Ben has assisted artists during workshops at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine, and most recently at Arrowmont School of Art and Craft in Gatlinburg, TN. He was also a participant as a resident in the second annual Arrowmont Pentaculum. He exhibits his work nationally.

- Nathan Willever -

  Nathan Willever   Two Yunomi , locally dug stoneware, white slip, cone 6 reduction

Nathan Willever
Two Yunomi,
locally dug stoneware, white slip, cone 6 reduction

Nathan Willever was raised in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics from Maine College of Art, in Portland, Maine. He has taught numerous classes and workshops on functional pottery at institutions such as The Clay Studio in Philadelphia, PA, Ox-Bow School of Art in Saugatuck, Michigan and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, ME. Nathan is currently a long term Resident and Zeldin Fellow at The Clay Studio.

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Painting Turned on its Head
Jul
15
to Jul 28

Painting Turned on its Head

Paula Wilson
PAINTING 649 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks

What if a painting became something other than a fixture on a wall? What if it was clothing, a rug for a room, or a by-product of a dance? What if we invited the anthropomorphization of an art work? This class takes traditional painting and turns it on its head. Upending conventional concepts (color, light, and scale) and classically formatted art academy practices (plein air, life studies, and emulation), we will focus on daily exercises and experiments during the first week, while the second week will be reserved for a final project. Media usage will be demonstrated and applied including collage, monotype, screen printing, painting, stitching, and stenciling. Materials other than canvas will be used as substrates. Determining the best media for the application, we will examine the effects of watercolor, gouache, acrylic, spray, and oil paints— while along the way tearing, layering, and reconfiguring. Let’s explore and translate existing models of artmaking to reinvent what painting can be and do!


FACULTY

- Paula Wilson - 

  Paula Wilson   Mooning,  2016 made in collaboration with the University of Oregon  monotype, screen print, woodblock print, and spray paint on muslin

Paula Wilson
Mooning, 2016
made in collaboration with the University of Oregon
monotype, screen print, woodblock print, and spray paint on muslin

Paula Wilson is a visual artist whose multimedia practice employs an extensive range of techniques to explore perceptions of light, form, and the body in space. Wilson’s work varies widely, encompassing sculpture, densely layered collage, painting, installation, and printmaking methods. Her subject matter is equally multifaceted, drawing inspiration from real and invented cultural histories and identities exploring myth, race and the dimensions of femininity. Based in Carrizozo, New Mexico, Paula Wilson’s work is included in the collections of The Studio Museum in Harlem, Yale University Art Gallery, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, and Saatchi Gallery, among others. Previous solo exhibitions have been at Cherry & Lucic Portland, The Fabric Workshop and Museum, and the Center for Contemporary Arts in Santa Fe. She holds an MFA from Columbia University and presently co-runs the artist-founded organization MoMAZoZo and the Carrizozo Colony.

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Lithography: Stone Lithography
Jul
15
to Jul 21

Lithography: Stone Lithography

2 WEEKS JUL. 15 -28
OR 1 WEEK:
WEEK 1 JUL. 15-21
WEEK 2 JUL. 22- 28

Danny Miller and Kristina Paabus
PRINT 637 001/ 635 001 or 635 002
1 credit hour, 1 week, $50 Lab Fee
or 3 credit hours, 2 weeks, $100 Lab Fee

This fast-paced course is designed for both beginners and advanced artists, (and will be offered in a two-week sequence). Week one focuses on traditional methods with stone lithography, and week two introduces students to photomechanical lithography using both hand-drawn and digital processes. Students are encouraged to investigate personal directions in their work as they explore lithographic possibilities through editions and unique variants. Emphasis will be placed on both conceptual and technical development, and additional demonstrations will be added based on the specific interests and needs of the participants. Class consists of demonstrations, presentations, work time, discussions, and critiques. Historical and contemporary lithographic examples will be presented in order to clarify the relationships between idea, context, material, and process.


FACULTY

- Danny Miller -

Danny Miller is an artist and musician working in Chicago, IL. Utilizing woodblock, lithographic printing and drawing, he conjures works inspired by science fiction pulp covers, Victorian engravings, advertisements, comic books and music. Miller has taught at Ohio State University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, SAIC and Ox-Bow School of Art and has been the Printmedia Department Manager at SAIC for 29 years. He received his MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has worked in professional print shops including Landfall Press, Normal Editions Workshop and Four Brothers Press, in addition to playing and teaching traditional fiddle and banjo music at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago.
 

  Danny Miller   Untitled,  2016, lithograph

Danny Miller
Untitled, 2016, lithograph

  Kristina Paabus   Something to Believe In,  2015 screen print and digital plotter drawing on paper 

Kristina Paabus
Something to Believe In, 2015
screen print and digital plotter drawing on paper 

- Kristina Paabus -

Kristina Paabus earned her BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited her work throughout the U.S. and Europe, and recent exhibitions include NEO Geo at the Akron Art Museum, Belt and Road at The National Gallery of Bulgaria, and the grass is the same color over there at Gallery Metropol in Estonia. Paabus is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship for Installation Art in Estonia, the Grant Wood Fellowship in Printmaking at The University of Iowa, and the Southern Graphics Council International Guanlan Residency Award. Kristina has attended numerous artist residences such as ACRE, Ox-Bow, Women’s Studio Workshop, Emmanuel College, SÍM, MUHU A.I., Guanlan Original Printmaking Base, NCCA Kronstadt, and Anderson Ranch Art Center. Paabus is Associate Professor of Reproducible Media at Oberlin College.

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Flora and Fauna of Ox-Bow: Nature Illustration in Watercolor
Jul
8
to Jul 14

Flora and Fauna of Ox-Bow: Nature Illustration in Watercolor

Peggy Macnamara
Painting: 613 001
1 credit hour, 1 week

This all level course concentrates on drawing and painting techniques. Specimens, birds, mammals, and insects from the Chicago Field Museum are provided so that students can draw from life and learn the layering watercolor technique. Field studies are encouraged so students can juxtapose animal life with suitable habitat. Modeling, measuring, building greys and browns, color theory is taught and demonstrated. Watercolor is a versatile medium and explorations of its many possibilities are encouraged.


FACULTY

- Peggy Macnamara - 

Peggy Macnamara has been Artist in Residence at the Field Museum in Chicago since 1990. She has published five books; Painting Wildlife published by Watson-Guptill and four others on nests, Illinois insects, migration and the return of the peregrine falcon with University of Chicago Press. She has a book on collections coming out in the Fall of 2017. Peggy is an Adjunct Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She teaches scientific illustration, colored pencil and watercolor techniques. She also lectures and teaches workshops around the country. She has exhibited widely and has work in many collections such as the New York State Museum, Field Museum, Elmhurst Museum, Illinois State Museum, and Woodson Art Museum.

She is the recipient of the Cora Bliss Taylor Fellowship for Distinguished Painters. Cora Bliss Taylor was a beloved watercolor teacher in Saugatuck and at Ox-Bow. Her strong vision and inspiring teaching capabilities le a great impression on her students, and many of her paintings hang in public spaces in Saugatuck/Douglas, providing a visual history of this community. The Taylor Fellowship was established by the Warnock family in 2000 to honor Cora Bliss and has in the past been used to bring eminent Visiting Artists to the Ox-Bow campus including Francois Mechain, Frances Whitehead, Susanna Coey, Ellen Lanyon, Olive Ahyens, Shona MacDonald, and Gladys Nilsson.

  Peggy Macnamara   Zoology Cabinet , 2015 watercolor on paper 

Peggy Macnamara
Zoology Cabinet, 2015
watercolor on paper 

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Monotype
Jul
8
to Jul 14

Monotype

Monotype
Aay Preston-Myint
PRINT 609 001
1 credit hour, 1 week
Lab Fee $50

This course will present a variety of oil and water-based monotype techniques including chine colle, block printing, painted and photographic image transfers, and over-printing. Monotype is a versatile process incorporating chance and improvisation, and can be performed in the landscape as well as in the studio. Painters as well as printmakers will find this a dynamic new medium that is perfect for the home studio.


FACULTY

- Aay Preston-Myint -

Aay Preston-Myint is an artist, printmaker, and educator living in Chicago, USA. His practice employs both visual and collaborative strategies to investigate memory and kinship, often within the specific context of queer community and history. In addition to his own work in interdisciplinary media, he is a founding member and chief organizer of several collectives and collaborative projects including: No Coast, an artist partnership that prints and distributes affordable contemporary artwork; the Chicago Art Book Fair, an annual event dedicated to showcasing emerging directions and diverse legacies within small press arts publishing; and Chances Dances, a party that supports and showcases the work of queer artists in Chicago.

  Aay Preston Myint   Untitled (Mirror) II and Untitled (Mirror) III,  2016 screen print and monoprint in dye, pigment, and bleach on hand-dyed canvas

Aay Preston Myint
Untitled (Mirror) II and Untitled (Mirror) III, 2016
screen print and monoprint in dye, pigment, and bleach on hand-dyed canvas

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Bird Science: An Introductory Survey
Jul
1
to Jul 14

Bird Science: An Introductory Survey

Dr. Dianne Jedlicka
SCIENCE 604 001
3 credits, Two-weeks

Ox-Bow provides a wonderful opportunity to observe many species of native birds in various habitats. This class will utilize the forest, meadow, dune, and lake in the vicinity by learning to identify local species followed by conducting observational research on select species. Worldwide distribution of the different bird families will then be looked at. The physics of flight, bird anatomy and physiology will be discussed. Lectures regarding egg laying, ecological and evolutionary adaptations and environmental influences on synchronization of egg hatching, food availability, predator/prey relationships, and migrations will be augmented by field trips to local zoos and museums. One identification test and two original written bird lab research papers will be required.


FACULTY

- Dr. Dianne Jedlicka -

 Dianne Jedlicka

Dianne Jedlicka

Dr. Dianne Jedlicka teaches numerous Biology courses at SAIC including Animal Behavior, Evolutionary Mammalogy, Ecology, and Human Anatomy and Physiology. Her primary research has been at the community level of organization focusing on the feeding strategies and predation of tree and ground squirrels based on their functional morphology. She recently published observational data collected on nocturnal foraging of the eastern cottontail rabbit. All of these animals are found throughout the Ox-Bow region and offer Dr. Jedlicka’s students ample opportunity for scientific observations. Dr. Jedlicka has also presented and published articles on new teaching methods and labs in the college classroom. Papers on mirror neurons and their implications for group behaviors is a current study topic of the Animal Behavior students. Mammals, birds, and of course, our own lagoon turtles will provide much insight into the animal kingdom.

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Activating and Animating Digital Collage
Jul
1
to Jul 14

Activating and Animating Digital Collage

Shani Peters
FVNMA 608 001
3 credit, 2 weeks

Accumulation, layering, and juxtaposition of images allow us to tell complex stories while simultaneously pointing to layers of societal reference. In this course, students will be introduced to various approaches to collage and basic animation techniques to create works that are embedded with personal meaning. Students will activate their compositions through performative projections, interactions with landscape, written or spoken text or as an online gif. More than static images on walls, these works will be experienced and expressed in relationship to the world they inhabit.
 


FACULTY

- Shani Peters -

Shani Peters (b. 1981 Lansing, MI) is a multi-disciplinary artist based in New York City. Her practice encompasses community building, activism histories, and the creation of accessible imaginative experiences. Peters holds a BA from Michigan State University and an MFA from the City College of New York. She has presented work in the U.S. and abroad at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York City; Seoul Art Space Geumcheon in South Korea; and the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Harare. Selected residencies include those hosted by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, The Laundromat Project, and Project Row Houses. Her work has been supported by the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Rauschenberg Foundation, Rema Hort Mann Foundation, and the Joan Mitchell Foundation. Peters is a university and museum educator, focusing her teaching at the intersection of art and social change.

  Shani Peters   Crown Futures (installation, process, and “Selfi-Determination Station” shots)  Shani Peters with Sugar Hill youth for the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling, 2016 ,  300 lasercut paper crowns, red carpet

Shani Peters
Crown Futures (installation, process, and “Selfi-Determination Station” shots)
Shani Peters with Sugar Hill youth for the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling, 2016, 300 lasercut paper crowns, red carpet

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Expression in Glass
Jul
1
to Jul 14

Expression in Glass

Arlo Fishman and Lancelot S. Fraser
GLASS 645 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks
Lab Fee $300

This class focuses on contemporary and traditional hot glass working techniques. Class projects invite an exploration of what works, and why. Students will develop their own designs and integrate concepts of heating, cooling, and gravity with their existing bodies of work. Demonstrations include traditional vessel forms, a survey of freehand sculpting techniques, plus intentional deviation from standard practice. Personal expression and technical skill will play into the texture of optics achieved. The history of this challenging and demanding substance will help examine the dichotomy between glass as craft material and fine art medium.


FACULTY

- Arlo Fishman -

Arlo Fishman is an artist and educator in the San Francisco Bay Area. His work spans several disciplines, including glass sculpture, electronic kinetics, and music composition. Arlo is a second generation glass blower and neon bender. He is also a highly skilled art installer who has installed sculptural neon at museums and institutions including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Walker Art Center, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Presently a faculty member at the Crucible, Arlo aims to dazzle, educate, and inspire awe through expert technological integration in art.
 

  Arlo Fishman   Wall Sign; Neon , 2013 glass, (found and fabricated)

Arlo Fishman
Wall Sign; Neon, 2013
glass, (found and fabricated)

-Lancelot S. Fraser -

  Lancelot S. Fraser   Gesture Bottles - Small Steal Blue and Black Pair,  2017 blown and sculpted glass

Lancelot S. Fraser
Gesture Bottles - Small Steal Blue and Black Pair, 2017
blown and sculpted glass

Lancelot S. Fraser grew up in the small mountain community of Idyllwild, California. At a young age he learned the craft of pottery and decided that he was going to be an artist. Lance began working with glass at Palomar College and received his BFA form California College of the Arts. He has attended the Pilchuck Glass School, Penland School of Crafts, Eugene Glass School, Appalachian Center for Crafts, and has taught at Ox-Bow School of Art. Lancelot is currently working as the Glass Studio Manager at California College of the Arts and Glass Faculty at The Crucible.

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Shaping the View: Site Responsive Proposals
Jul
1
to Jul 14

Shaping the View: Site Responsive Proposals

Linda Sormin & Dawn Franklin
CER 644 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks
Lab Fee $150

This course will encourage students to study, imagine, and shape new possibilities for the architectural folly. A folly is a type of ornamental building or structure with no practical purpose that offers dimension and shapes one’s experience of the landscape. It urges toward a destination, provides space for reflection, or gives shelter.  Clay and its potential for building will be the ideal material used to explore these ideas. Through charrettes, drawing, model making, and the hand building of clay forms students will explore site-responsive work. Students will work individually and collaboratively to fabricate both in the studio and landscape.  Class demos, site visits, and discussions will challenge attitudes towards materiality, scale, proportion, and location.


FACULTY

- Linda Sormin -

Through objects and site-responsive installations, Linda Sormin’s work explores issues of fragility, aggression, mobility, survival and regeneration. Born in Bangkok, Thailand, Sormin moved to Canada with her family at the age of five. Sormin worked in community development for four years in Thailand and Laos. She studied ceramics at Andrews University, Sheridan College and Alfred University. Sormin is Associate Professor of Ceramics at New York State College at Alfred University. Sormin’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, most recently at the Everson Museum, Disjecta Contemporary Art Center, Bluecoat Art Gallery, Ferrin Contemporary, National Gallery of Indonesia, Jogja National Museum and SaRang Building in Indonesia, the West Norway Museum of Decorative Art, Denver Art Museum and gl Holtegaard in Denmark.

  Linda Sormin   Strange Feeling , 2017, glazed ceramic. Photo by Brian Oglesbee.

Linda Sormin
Strange Feeling, 2017,
glazed ceramic.
Photo by Brian Oglesbee.

- Dawn Franklin -

Architecture is everywhere. From basic utility to astonishing complexity, it is a constant presence surrounding the most mundane and spectacular of human activities. The practice of creating architecture is informed by our experience of what is transgressive, pleasing and necessary for comfort, safety, conservation, economy and delight. Dawn Franklin’s daily work in the 20 years since graduating from Andrews University with a B.Arch. degree has been the practice of creating architecture. Architecture that solves problems; is concerned with visual expressiveness; is occupied with materiality, form, scale; and strives toward imaginative and technical skill. She finds it to be a complicated, engaging balancing act that is at moments contemplative and solitary; but is most often a collaborative ensemble performance with clients, engineers, government and construction professionals all shouting their parts. Dawn is a project architect at Collins Cooper Carusi Architects in Atlanta, Georgia.

  Dawn Franklin   Reflected Ceiling Plan and Elevation, Dining Hall Renovation,  2016 3D sketch

Dawn Franklin
Reflected Ceiling Plan and Elevation, Dining Hall Renovation, 2016
3D sketch

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Pre-College Program: Landscape Drawing
Jul
1
to Jul 7

Pre-College Program: Landscape Drawing

E.W. Ross and Olivia Petrides
DRAWING 407 001
1 credit hour, 1 week

Drawing upon the natural terrain of Ox-Bow, students explore drawing, design, composition and creativity. A wide variety of drawing materials are used. Slide lectures, critiques, and meetings with visiting artists are included each evening.
Note to parents/guardians: All Pre-College students are required to reside on campus during the course. Students are chaperoned and rules and regulations are strictly enforced. An adult chaperone is housed with Pre-College students throughout the week. Students must provide their own transportation to and from Ox-Bow. Pre-College students are not allowed to have vehicles on campus.


FACUTLY

- E.W. Ross -

  E.W. Ross   “Pablo’s Owl in Landscape”  2012, ink on paper

E.W. Ross
“Pablo’s Owl in Landscape” 2012,
ink on paper

E.W. Ross is an artist based in Chicago. He has taught at SAIC, University of Chicago, University of Minnesota, Atlanta College of Art, Western Michigan University and the Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency. Previously, he served as the Program Director at Ox-Bow and the Dean of Continuing Studies at SAIC. He has had solo exhibitions at the Chicago Cultural Center; Cajarc, France; Phipps Center for the Arts, Hudson, WI; Chicago Firehouse and earned the Illinois Arts Council Individual Artist’s Fellowship; Chicago Council of Fine Arts; Alliance of Independent Colleges of Art Grant; School of the Art Institute Faculty Enrichment Grants; and IAC Governor’s International Arts Exchange Grant.
 

- Olivia Petrides -

  Olivia Petrides   Blue,  2015 ink and gouache on paper

Olivia Petrides
Blue, 2015
ink and gouache on paper

Olivia Petrides has exhibited in galleries and museums in Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Scotland, Seattle, Washington, D.C., and Chicago. Her works are in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution; the United States Park Service; the Field Museum; the Illinois State Museum; Openlands Preservation Association; and Iceland’s Hafnarborg Institute of Art, among others. She has received a Fulbright Grant; American-Scandinavian Foundation Grants; Margaret Phillips Klimek Fellowship; Chicago Community Arts Assistance Program grant; an Illinois Arts Council Governor’s International Exchange Award and an Illinois Arts Council Special Projects Award. She has been awarded residencies at the Rekjavik Municipal Museum and the Gil-society in Iceland; the Faroe Islands Museum of Natural History; the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts; the Vermont Studio Center; Catwalk, New York; Yellowstone National Park; and the Ragdale Foundation. Petrides received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Painting & Drawing Department and the Visual Communications Department.

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Etching
Jul
1
to Jul 7

Etching

John O’Donnell
PRINT 601 001
1 credit hour, 1 week
Lab Fee $50

Students will be introduced to various methods used in making intaglio prints. Demonstrated techniques will include etching, drypoint, and aquatint, as well as a variety of experimental approaches to plate-making and printing. Discussion and critique of work will be included with equal emphasis on technique and concept.


FACULTY

- John O’Donnell -

John O’Donnell is an Assistant Professor of Printmaking at the University of Connecticut. He has been making prints for 21 years and his current printmaking and drawing practice investigates “Hollow Earth Theory” which is a fantastic idea that the earth is hollow and composed of multiple layers of different subterranean realties.  In addition to being a dedicated printmaker he is also a multidisciplinary artist and performer. He has exhibited his prints at the Print Center in Philadelphia, the International Print Center in New York and Seoul Museum of Art in Seoul, South Korea. He has created performance and installation pieces for Blue House Arts, Dayton, OH; Glass Box Gallery, Seattle, WA; New Britain Museum of American Art; Museum of New Art in Detroit, MI; Proof Gallery in Boston, MA; FluxSpace in Philadelphia, PA; and SOHO20 Gallery in New York, NY.

 

 
  John O’Donnell   Hollow Earth: Morphology , 2017 etching

John O’Donnell
Hollow Earth: Morphology, 2017
etching

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Goo, Chunks and Sometimes Vases: Glassblowing for Beginners & Maestros
Jun
24
to Jun 30

Goo, Chunks and Sometimes Vases: Glassblowing for Beginners & Maestros

Tim Belliveau
Glass 644 001
1 credit hour, 1 week
Lab Fee $150

Students will survey a wide variety of techniques using standard glass tools and equipment while also receiving more specialized instruction on particular techniques and processes to pursue specific projects. Through demonstrations, discussions, and experimentation students will build a deeper understanding of the medium and the best methods to realize their ideas. This course will teach glassblowing basics and assist experienced students in furthering their own abilities. Beginning glassblowers and advanced students alike will oscillate between tradition and experimentation in order to find the perfect method through which to realize their desired form or concept.


FACULTY

- Tim Belliveau -

Tim Belliveau is an artist and teacher working primarily in glass, ceramic and 3D software, blending sculptural materials made by hand with geometric prints and renderings made on computer. Belliveau was born in Montréal and received his BFA in glass from the Alberta College of Art and Design in 2005. He co-founded Bee Kingdom glass studio in 2005 as well as Berlin’s first public glass studio, Berlin Glas e.V. in 2012. He was a 2017 resident at the Europees Keramisch Werkcentrum (EKWC) in the Netherlands and currently lives and teaches in Montréal. His work with the Bee Kingdom collective has been exhibited at the Cheongju Craft Biennale, The Pergamon Museum and at the Pictoplasma festival in Monterrey, Mexico.

  Tim Belliveau   Melt Mountain,  2012 glass (blown and slumped)

Tim Belliveau
Melt Mountain, 2012
glass (blown and slumped)

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Questioning Landscape
Jun
24
to Jun 30

Questioning Landscape

Carris Adams
PAINTING 651 001
1 credit hour, 1 week

In Questioning Landscape students are invited to redefine their perceptions of the landscape through various approaches to observational painting. While gaining proficiency in the techniques and vocabulary of painting, students will develop new ways of representing
the landscape outside notions of the “serene” and “pastoral”. This class focuses on capturing everyday objects and visual culture found within the local landscape. Beginning with preparatory works on paper, we will move on to using acrylic or oil paints to realize finished pieces.In this class students will be challenged to experiment with the material properties of paint as well as the principles and elements of design. Students will be expected to contribute constructively to discussions about the work of their classmates. Additionally the instructor will provide theoretical and visual resources to inform students’ use of form and content.


FACULTY

- Carris Adams -

Carris Adams is a visual artist whose practice consists of drawings and paintings that reference signs and signifiers in the landscape pointing to systemic inequality and resilience. The conceptually multi-layered works seek to inform and position viewers to recognize their reactions concerning class and othered bodies.  Adams received her BFA from the University of Texas at Austin and her MFA from the University of Chicago.

  Carris Adams   MXMLK II,  2017 ink and acrylic enamel on wall

Carris Adams
MXMLK II, 2017
ink and acrylic enamel on wall

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Ghost in the Machine
Jun
17
to Jun 30

Ghost in the Machine

Sarah and Joseph Belknap
PHOTO 611 001
3 credit hours, 2 weeks
Lab Fee $100

"I cannot find my centre of gravity." Mary Anne Atwood—This class utilizes and facilitates ways of perceiving beyond the human machine. Using various light sensitive media, the darkroom, film and digital cameras, solar and night time telescopes, binoculars, sound recorders, and night vision cameras, we explore time and the properties of waves. We will produce images, videos, sound installations, and performances. Beyond studio work we will look into art, cinema, and literature works exploring themes in science, time, and perception. Practices by numerous artists will be explored including but not limited to James Turrell, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Werner Herzog, Simon Starling, Carsten Nicolai, Sarah Charlesworth and Alan Lightman.


FACULTY

- Sarah and Joseph Belknap -

Sarah Belknap and Joseph Belknap are Chicago-based interdisciplinary artists and educators who received their MFAs from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Working as a team since 2008, their art has been exhibited in artist-run exhibition spaces in Springfield, Brooklyn, Detroit, Minneapolis, Kansas City, and St. Louis. In addition, they have presented performances at institutions throughout Chicago, including the Chicago Cultural Center, Hyde Park Art Center, and Links Hall. Their work has been shown at the Columbus Museum of Art, The Arts Club of Chicago, the Chicago Artists’ Coalition, Western Exhibitions, and a solo show at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. They are currently working on a solo show at Illinois State University that will open during the Fall of 2018. In addition to the show they are collaborating with ISU’s planetarium to produce programming and are working with the city of Normal, IL to produce a large scale public installation.

  Sarah and Joseph Belknap   Fall,  2013. digital archival print

Sarah and Joseph Belknap
Fall, 2013.
digital archival print

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