Aug
13
to Aug 19

The World of Korean Papermaking

PRINT 645 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $50

In this course, students will learn the process of making hanji (Korean paper) from raw paper mulberry bark, as well as methods of manipulating paper—both made in class and imported from Korea. By working together students will complete various steps to prepare the raw materials for sheet formation in both heullim tteugi and gadum tteugi techniques. Bark considered too tough to make paper will be transformed into bark lace for fiber, sculpture, and book applications. Hanji of varied colors and types will be used to fuse (joomchi), cord and weave (jiseung), and spin into thread. Alongside the unique history and folklore of hanji, the instructor will share her own hybrid methods of using this durable and malleable substrate. This is an ideal course for students interested in the depth and breadth of East Asian paper traditions, paper's role in material culture, and the experience of manual labor and patience to sustain a time-tested craft.


From the mud, hanji, dye, thread. 12” x 10”, 2016, Photo by Stefan Hagen

From the mud, hanji, dye, thread. 12” x 10”, 2016, Photo by Stefan Hagen

Faculty

Aimee Lee is an artist, papermaker, writer, and the leading hanji researcher and practitioner in the United States. She earned her BA from Oberlin College and her MFA from Columbia College Chicago). Her Fulbright research on Korean paper led to her award-winning book, Hanji Unfurled, and the first US hanji studio in Cleveland. She has taught and lectured at the American Museum of Natural History, Asian Art Museum, Cleveland Museum of Art, Denver Art Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art Paper Conservation Department, Oberlin College, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Mills College, University of the Arts, University of Iowa Center for the Book, Center for Book Arts, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Peters Valley School of Craft, Penland School of Crafts, and North Bennett Street School. Her artist books reside in library collections that include the Joan Flasch Artists’ Books Collection, Indiana University, Museum of Modern Art, and Yale University.

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Aug
13
to Aug 19

Thought Collections: Exploring Book Structures

PRINT 648 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $50

This course introduces bookbinding skills to students who will create a series of different hand-bound books, from pamphlets and stab bindings to more complex codex-style structures like the Coptic and longstitch. Each morning the instructor will introduce new binding techniques, and will follow up with an afternoon of content-building exercises using the environment, landscape, and a variety of drawing and collage materials. Students will explore ways of gathering and manipulating information in a portable format, resulting in a small volume of hand-held works.


Desert Desertion (Ashes), studio furniture, milk crates, lamp, paper, extension cords, collected paper documents, drawings, notes, and ephemera dating back to 1992, dimensions vary, approx. 25' diameter, 2015

Desert Desertion (Ashes), studio furniture, milk crates, lamp, paper, extension cords, collected paper documents, drawings, notes, and ephemera dating back to 1992, dimensions vary, approx. 25' diameter, 2015

Faculty

Regin Igloria maintains a multidisciplinary studio practice in Chicago, IL, which revolves around teaching and serving as an arts administrator. He has taught for Marwen, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois State University, Snow City Arts, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Rhode Island School of Design, and other institutions. In 2010, he founded North Branch Projects, a community bookbinding project based in Albany Park, Chicago. His work has been exhibited and collected internationally, including the ANTI Contemporary Art Festival, Out of Site Performance Festival Chicago, Tiger Strikes Asteroid, The Franklin, Zg Gallery, and The Center for Book Arts NYC. He is a recipient of a 3Arts Teaching Artist Award, Propeller Grant, and an Americans for the Arts Fellowship. Residencies include Montello Foundation, Ucross, ACRE, The Wormfarm Institute, and Chicago Art Department. He received his MFA in Painting from Rhode Island School of Design and his BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Aug
13
to Aug 19

Written On/In The Print

PRINT 643 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $50

This print course focuses on text as it relates to the print image and vice versa. Students will work between sessions of woodcut printmaking and sessions of writing that speak to the images they are carving. We will look at the work of artists such as Glen Ligon, Lesley Dill, and Christopher Wool, who use the relationship between text and image in their work. Group technical demonstrations and individual guidance will be part of each session. Within the span of the course, all participants will have combinations of prints and texts in both large and small formats. This course is for beginning through advanced printmakers and/or writers.


Balance, woodcut prints on Japanese paper, 52 - 72" high x 28", 2016.

Balance, woodcut prints on Japanese paper, 52 - 72" high x 28", 2016.

Faculty

Jeanine Coupe Ryding’s work has been shown throughout the U.S. and abroad and her prints and artist books are in museum collections. She focuses primarily on woodcut prints, etchings, artist’s books, drawing and collage and has founded both Shadow Press and Press 928 in Evanston, Illinois for artists books publishing. She received her BA from The University of Iowa and her MFA from Universitat der Kunste, Berlin, Germany. She has received various awards and residencies including Illinois Arts Council Award, Arts Midwest, Frans Masereel Center, Belgium and Anchor Graphics, Chicago. Her work is represented by: Atrium Gallery in St. Louis, Olson Larsen Gallery in Des Moines and August Art in London. She has been teaching at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago since 1991.

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Aug
13
to Aug 19

Paint and Landscape: Material as Narrative

PAINTING 624 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour

This multilevel painting course will investigate painting as a form of language, where color, surface, and marks are considered as indicative of narrative. Students will consider questions such as: how do light, space, and color suggest narrative? How do surface and mark making direct the reading of a painting, and how can meaning morph based on context? Using direct observation of the landscape as a jumping off point, students will be encouraged to work from other sources, such as memory and photographs. We will also examine painting in both contemporary and historical contexts. Oil paint will be supported, with demonstrations on techniques and material properties of oil. However, other media such as watercolor, gouache, and acrylic will also be supported for multi-level students.


West Rock with Branches, wood, wire, epoxy, archival print on canvas, acrylic paint, gel mediums, sand, glue, hardware, 2012, Commission for: New Britain Museum of American Art

West Rock with Branches, wood, wire, epoxy, archival print on canvas, acrylic paint, gel mediums, sand, glue, hardware, 2012, Commission for: New Britain Museum of American Art

Valerie Hegarty is a visual artist based in Brooklyn who creates paintings, sculptures, and installations that often address themes of memory, place and history. Hegarty’s solo exhibitions include Nicelle Beauchene, NY; Marlborough Gallery Chelsea; Locust Projects, Miami; Museum 52, London; the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago; and Guild & Greyshkul, NY, among others including a commission for a public sculpture on New York’s High Line and her more recent show of site-specific installations in The Brooklyn Museum’s period rooms. Hegarty has been awarded numerous grants through foundations such as the Pollock Krasner Foundation, The New York Foundation for the Arts, the Rema Hort Mann Foundation, the Tiffany Foundation, and Campari NY. Residencies include LMCC, Marie Walsh Sharpe, PS 122, MacDowell, Yaddo and Smack Mellon. Hegarty received an MFA from SAIC, a BFA from San Francisco’s Academy of Art College and a BA from Middlebury College, VT.

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Jul
30
to Aug 12

Metal Casting for Sculpture

SCULP 614 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $200

This beginning through advanced level Metals Casting course concentrates on casting bronze and iron into sodium silicate bonded sand molds. Students create patterns and molds, learn the process of melting and pouring the metal, and finishing and patination techniques for their castings. Class time focuses on safety in the foundry, history of the metal casting process, and developing an understanding between the foundry process, pattern generation, and personal expression. Students are encouraged to develop a series of individual research projects while also responding to the natural environment of Ox-Bow’s open-air metal sculpture studio/foundry.


Detroit Population Shift, cnc milled and cast aluminum, 36” x 24” x 18”, 2009, Photo: Tim Thayer

Detroit Population Shift, cnc milled and cast aluminum, 36” x 24” x 18”, 2009, Photo: Tim Thayer

Faculty

Norwood Viviano’s work from his installation Cities: Departure & Deviation was shown at the 2014 Architecture Biennale in Venice. In 2015, his work was the subject of a solo museum exhibition at the Grand Rapids Art Museum and included in the MFA Boston exhibition Crafted: Object in Flux. In 2016, his work is the subject of a solo museum exhibit at the Chrysler Museum of Art and will be included in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery exhibition Visions and Revisions: Renwick Invitational. Norwood received a BFA from Alfred University and an MFA in Sculpture from the Cranbrook Academy of Art. His pieces are held in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY, deYoung Museum, San Francisco, CA, Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague; John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, WI; and the Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA, as well as in private collections. Norwood is currently an Associate Professor and Sculpture Program Coordinator at Grand Valley State University.

Ishpeming, cast concrete, cast bronze, cast iron, 2016

Ishpeming, cast concrete, cast bronze, cast iron, 2016

Daniel Matheson, Foundry Manager The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2006) Instructional Foundry Technician, Sculpture (1999). BFA, 1995, Buffalo State College, Buffalo, NY. Exhibitions: Pirkkala Sculpture Park (Finland). Freeark Gallery (NY). Riverside Arts Center (IL). Grounds for Sculpture (NJ). The Burchfield-Penny Art Center (NY). Sedgwick Studios (IL). Casting Demonstrations: Portland Museum of Science and Industry (OR). St. Bonaventure (NY). Ashford Hollow Foundation ( NY). Morten Arboretum (IL). Visiting Artist: Grand Valley State University (MI). Indianapolis Art Center (IN).

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Jul
30
to Aug 12

Complexity (Finding & Making Space in Wild Color)

PAINTING, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours

This course will explore collage and assemblage through a range of “attachment” methods and materials, including glue and nails but also metaphors, like how babies form attachment and how adults continue to love, connect and make sense of their lives. Through writing, drawing, and building small layered spaces with images, objects, scraps of wood, paint and found materials from the surrounding woods and thrift stores, students will devise structures for understanding the complexity of experiences in the world and virtual spaces. Using layers, lenses, frames, architectural models, psychological projection, “flow”, data, statistics, information processing, primate visions, “Ways of Knowing”, poetics, politics, media studies, and détournement, the goal of this class will be to disorganize, to be messy and intuitive, and to saturate our senses with the complexities of physical space. Students will read Francois Cheng on Chinese painting, Leo Steinberg on the flatbed picture plane, Hito Steyerl on vertigo, Lauren Berlant on attachment, The Devil in the White City for its description of psychological architecture, and will look underwater, in our purses and coat pockets, into geological strata and nurse logs, tide-pools and bird cages, cosmic models and snail shells to think about “space as the place,” as Sun Ra said. And we will do it all in color.


Molly Zuckerman-Hartung, Notley, 2013, Latex housepaint, enamel, and spray paint on dropcloth, 96 × 132 inches

Molly Zuckerman-Hartung, Notley, 2013, Latex housepaint, enamel, and spray paint on dropcloth, 96 × 132 inches

Faculty

Molly Zuckerman-Hartung was born in 1975 in Los Gatos, CA, grew up in Olympia, WA, received her MFA in 2007 from SAIC, and recently relocated to Shelton CT, where she lives and works. She is a member of the Painting faculty at Yale School of Art. She Her work is included in the collections of the Walker Art Center, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Painter, Painter at the Walker Art Center, (Minneapolis, MN); The Program at ReMap4 (Athens, Greece); Michelle Grabner: I Work From Home at MOCA Cleveland (Cleveland, OH); Shakti at Brand New Gallery (Milan, Italy); and a solo exhibition, Chlorophyll Bluess at Diana Lowenstein (Miami, FL). Recent exhibitions include a 2016 solo show in Detroit's Michael Jon and Alan Gallery, the 2014 Whitney Biennial and Violet Fogs Azure Snot at Corbett vs. Dempsey (Chicago, IL). She wrote (the 95 theses on painting) in 2010.

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Jul
30
to Aug 12

Lithography: Stone and Photolithography

PRINT 637 001, July 30-August 12, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, $100 Lab Fee

PRINT 635 001, July 30-August 5, 1 week, 1 credit hour, $50 Lab Fee

PRINT 635 002, August 6-12, 1 week, 1 credit hour, $50 Lab Fee

This class will be offered in a two-week sequence and give the beginner and/or more advanced artist the chance to learn the traditional lithographic technique in week one. Week two we will introduce the photo plate using analog methods or digitally manipulated photo positives. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how to make a lithograph both in editions and as unique variants. Demonstrations will be given for the preparation of matrices, color mixing and modifying inks as necessary, as well as more advanced drawing techniques as required by participants’ needs and interests. Historical examples from the collection of The Art Institute of Chicago will be discussed in presentations aimed at enhancing participants’ aesthetic point of view.


Faculty

Mark Pascale serves as an Adjunct Professor in Printmedia at SAIC and the Janet and Craig Duchossois Curator of Prints and Drawings, at the Art Institute of Chicago. He holds a BA from Southern Connecticut State College and an MFA from Ohio State University. He has organized exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago and Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art and produced publications including Martin Puryear: Multiple Dimensions (forthcoming), Contemporary Drawings from the Irving Stenn, Jr. Collection; Jasper Johns: Gray; and The Picture Tells the Story: The Drawings of Joseph E. Yoakum.

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Jul
30
to Aug 12

Wet-Plate and Platinotypes

PHOTO 609 001, July 30-August 12, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $300

PHOTO 610 001, July 30-August 5, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $150

PHOTO 610 002, August 6-12, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $150

Using the historic, time-honored wet-plate collodion and platinotype processes students will move between the studio, community, and natural environment at Ox-Bow to create images and photographic objects. These courses can be taken sequentially for two weeks or individually for one week.

The first week will focus on wet-plate collodion; students will explore the fundamentals of large format photography using analog view cameras to create glass-plate negatives in the field. Mobile, onsite darkrooms will allow instant gauging in progress and results. Glass plates can stand alone as photographic objects or be reproduced in photographic printing. During week two students will work with platinotype printing, one of the most stable photographic processes. Students will use the traditional iron-based developing-out process of platinum palladium. Using digital cameras and laptops to capture images, they will digitally print negatives to be used in this unique tactile process. Those who participate in wet-plate collodion will be able to print directly from their glass plate negatives.


Curzon Village, Bonne Bay, Newfoundland, platinotype, 2005

Curzon Village, Bonne Bay, Newfoundland, platinotype, 2005

Faculty

Robert Clarke Davis has served as an Associate Professor in Photography at SAIC since 1990. He earned his BA from Beloit College and an MA at the University of London, Goldsmiths' College, School of Art and Design. His work has exhibited at Cleveland Museum of Art; Milwaukee Art Museum; Wuk Kunsthalle, Vienna; and Magyar Fotogr'fiai M'zeum Kesckem't, Hungary. Publication: Pinhole Journal. His work is held in the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art; Fine Arts Library, Indiana University, IN; Impressions Gallery, North Yorkshire; The Rooms Corporation of Newfoundland and Labrador. Awards include the Purchase Award, Impressions Gallery; Pouch Cove Foundation Visual Artists Residency Parks Canada/Art Gallery of Newfoundland and Labrador Art in the Park Residency, Gros Morne NL. He is represented by James Baird Gallery.

Untitled from the Second series, color negative film scan, 2016

Untitled from the Second series, color negative film scan, 2016

Jaclyn Monica Silverman received her BFA from The Ohio State University and MFA from SAIC, focusing in photography. She has exhibited at Hopkins Hall Gallery and Corridor, Urban Arts Space, Shot Tower Gallery, Women’s Gallery in Youngstown, Ohio, Thomases Gallery, Sullivan Gallery in Chicago, Illinois, and The Dairy Center for the Arts in Boulder, Colorado. Her work is part of a collective photographic portfolio at The Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection (2016) and The Art Institute of Chicago (2016), and has curated an exhibition with The Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection. She is the recipient of the Denman Research Grant, The John Fergus Family Memorial Endowment for the Arts, Mary Martin Picarillo Award, and Women Artists of Youngstown, Ohio. Silverman, invited by Gina Osterloh, has lectured at Otterbein University (2013) Westerville, Ohio, and has been a Visiting Lecturer (2016-2017) at The Ohio State University in the department of photography.

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Jul
30
to Aug 12

Object Permanence

CER 641 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $150

Object Permanence is the understanding that objects continue to exist even when they cannot directly be observed. This fundamental psychological concept, first conceived of by Jean Piaget concerning cognitive development, will serve as a foundation for the investigation of historical and contemporary objects. Through studio practice, research and discourse, students will examine notions related to perception, context, engagement and the socio-cultural wakes left by objects. This multi-level course will hybridize art and social science by introducing students to a range of technical and conceptual strategies to understand, interrogate and intervene with objects from life. Technical instruction will include a wide range of approaches from hand building and mold making to digital scanning in three dimensions, observational sculpture and investigative writing.

SEWING THE SURFACE OF THE WATER | Performance, 2011 (Craft Mystery Cult)

SEWING THE SURFACE OF THE WATER | Performance, 2011 (Craft Mystery Cult)

Faculty

Jovencio de la Paz is an artist, writer, and educator. His work explores the intersection of textile processes such as weaving, dye, and surface design, with broader concerns of ancient technology, language, codification, community, and identity. Interested in the ways transient or ephemeral experiences are embodied in material, de la Paz looks to how knowledge, stories, and memories are transmitted through society in space and time, whether semiotically by language or haptically by made things. He has exhibited his work both nationally and internationally, most recently at Threewalls, Chicago, IL; The Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland, OR; Carl & Sloan Contemporary Art, Portland, OR; 4th Ward Projects, Chicago, IL; The Sculpture Center, Cleveland, OH; SPACE Gallery, Portland, ME; SOIL Gallery, Seattle, WA; Roots & Culture Contemporary Art Center, Chicago; The Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago; and Uri Gallery, Seoul, South Korea. He received an MFA from the Cranbrook Academy of Art and a BFA in Fiber and Material Studies from SAIC. He regularly teaches at schools of art, craft, and design throughout the country, including the Ox-Bow School of Art, the Haystack Mountain School of Craft, the Arrowmont School of Craft, and the University of Oregon where he serves as Assistant Professor and Curricular Head of Fibers

A Directional Antenna for Broadcasting Pirate Radio, colored porcelain, copper, steel and miscellaneous electrical components, 28" x 10" x 10", 2016. 

A Directional Antenna for Broadcasting Pirate Radio, colored porcelain, copper, steel and miscellaneous electrical components, 28" x 10" x 10", 2016. 

Brian Gillis examines sociocultural issues as consequent evidence of particular historic moments. His work uses a variety of production strategies and conceptual approaches. These often draw from specific sites and related institutions, and range from the production of objects and editions of multiples to site-specific installations and actions. Gillis is the recipient of distinctions including fellowships from the Illinois Arts Council, Oregon Arts Commission, MacDowell Colony, and a recent residency at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art. Gillis has exhibited his work nationally and internationally at institutions including CUE Art Foundation, the Mint Museum, and the Milwaukee Art Museum, as well as the Cluj Museum of Art (Romania) and Heilongjiang University (China). He received an MFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University and is an Associate Professor of Art at the University of Oregon.

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Jul
30
to Aug 12

Organic Mechanix: Systems-Based Approaches to Glass

GLASS 642 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $300

This course will use the stunning ecology and structures of organic matter surrounding Ox-Bow as inspiration for designing and implementing dynamic, four-dimensional art systems. Students will explore the possibilities of combining glass with a wide range of materials as well as time-based media to invent mechanisms of movement and growth. Studio demos will be project responsive and focus on direct ways to blow, cast, fabricate and engineer glass elements to contain, magnify, distort, energize or destroy the systems. Conversations will revolve around how to effectively use the unique sculptural properties of glass to amplify personal concepts and interests. No previous glass experience is required.

 

AH WA NI WAH | blown glass, tubing, metal chamber, bonsai preservation unit, decaying log, seawater, junk food, my garbage, a deadbird, an old shoe, a Jacobs ladder atom splitter, 2013

AH WA NI WAH | blown glass, tubing, metal chamber, bonsai preservation unit,
decaying log, seawater, junk food, my garbage, a deadbird, an old shoe, a Jacobs ladder atom splitter, 2013

Faculty

Ben Wright holds a BS in Evolutionary Biology from Dartmouth College, a BFA in Glass from the Appalachian Center for Crafts, and an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. His background in biology figures strongly in his artwork, which delves deeply into the every evolving relationship between humans and their environment. Through work ranging from interactive visual installations to sonic landscapes he engages all of his viewer’s senses and often bridges the gap between art and science. He has taught his unique approach to art making at numerous schools including Pilchuck Glass School, Penland School of Craft and the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and abroad in Germany, Turkey, Denmark and Japan and is currently the Director of Education at UrbanGlass in Brooklyn, New York.

 

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Jul
16
to Jul 29

Rewilding

SCULPT 650 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $100

In this sculpture and installation course students will have the opportunity to contextualize their practice in the surrounding landscape of Ox-Bow using the concept of “rewilding” as their springboard. An abstract examination of the psychological and ecological implications of rewilding habitats and reversing human domestication will lead to the consideration of engineered environments, artificial interventions and ultimately, using uncertainty as a tool for making art. Morning meetings will be devoted to readings, discussions, and presentations. Students will develop their ideas, experiment with materials, and determine their sites for the first half of the course in preparation for creating and presenting their final project during the second half.

 


Partition, kiln-dried wood, enamel, mirror, 16" x 6" x 5", 2014

Partition, kiln-dried wood, enamel, mirror, 16" x 6" x 5", 2014

Faculty

Heather Mekkelson is a multidisciplinary artist working primarily in sculpture and installation. Born in New York and raised in dozens of East Coast, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwestern locations, she is currently based in Chicago. Mekkelson earned her MFA at the University of Illinois at Chicago and her BFA from SAIC. She has had several solo exhibitions in Chicago galleries, most recently at 65GRAND in 2014. Her work has been exhibited in group shows in galleries and institutions nationally and has been featured in Art Journal, Art21 Magazine, Artforum.com, Artnet, Flavorpill, Hyperallergic, Newcity, Time Out Chicago, and others. She has been the recipient of several fellowships and grants including the 2012 Artadia Award. Mekkelson is represented by 65GRAND.

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Jul
16
to Jul 29

Go Figure: Representing the Human Form in Painting

PAINTING 647 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours

This class will explore ways of representing the figure in painting. Whether observed or imagined, all figurative painting requires invention. Maintaining the believability of that invention, no matter how “unreal” it might become, will be the focus of the class. We will look at a range of figurative representation, from the ancient to the present. After a series of drawing and painting assignments involving shape, scale, and distortion we will move on to self-directed figurative paintings that will engage the whole language of painting.


Hymn, oil and wax on linen, 28” x 22”, 2016

Hymn, oil and wax on linen, 28” x 22”, 2016

Faculty

Richard Hull joined the Phyllis Kind Gallery before his graduation from the SAIC, where many of Chicago’s legendary Imagist painters showed in the late 1970’s, including Roger Brown, Jim Nutt, Ed Paschke, Christina Ramberg, and Karl Wirsum. He was known then for painting abstracted architectural interiors where towers, gabled roofs, and arched doorways combine with the geometric solids and intersecting planes to form a framework in which various figurative elements are situated. Hull calls his recent paintings and drawings “stolen portraits”. His crayon drawings, in particular, are portraits in the form of hairdos, each one expressing a distinct visual personality rather than a representation of a particular individual. His paintings, drawings and prints are in the collections of several museums including the Art Institute of Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Smithsonian Museum. Washington D.C.; Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and the Smart Museum, Chicago. He has exhibited his work at the Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City; the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT; Contemporary Art Center, Cincinnati, OH; Portland Art Museum OR; the Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, OH; Herron Gallery of Art, Indianapolis, IN; Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, MI; Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Evanston, IL; and the Painting Center, New York, NY.

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Jul
16
to Jul 29

Beginning Glass (Session 2)

GLASS 630 002, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $300

This course offers hands-on glassblowing experience to the beginner. Participants learn a variety of techniques for manipulating molten “hot glass” into vessel or sculptural forms. Lectures, videos, demonstrations, and critiques will augment studio instruction.

 

Artifactual, blown, hot sculpted, sandblasted glass, 7" x 20" x 4", 2016. Photo Credit: Nathan J Shaulis

Artifactual, blown, hot sculpted, sandblasted glass, 7" x 20" x 4", 2016. Photo Credit: Nathan J Shaulis

Faculty

Leo Tecosky's work is a mashup of art x craft x design. Combining traditional glassblowing techniques, graffiti, stylized typography and Islamic geometric motifs, he creates new objects that do not conform to any one discipline. With a BA in Fine Art from Alfred University and an MFA from The School of Visual Arts in Manhattan, Tecosky teaches at studios and universities both nationally and internationally. Leo lives and works in Brooklyn, blowing glass and maintaining a studio practice.

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Jul
16
to Jul 29

Papermaking

PAPER 604 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $100

Paper is an exciting and elusive art medium. Paper pulp can be transformed into sculptural works, drawings with pulp and unusual surface textures. It can allude to skin, metal, rock, or represent something entirely unique. In class, we will explore these possibilities as we examine other artists using pulp as a contemporary medium. Traditional and non-traditional processes, tailored to the capabilities of each fiber, will be explored. Stretch your artistic and technical skills to create unusual works of art.


Queen Anne’s Lace, ink on handmade cotton rag, 2014

Queen Anne’s Lace, ink on handmade cotton rag, 2014

Andrea Peterson lives and creates work in northwest Indiana at Hook Pottery Paper, a studio and gallery co-owned with her husband. She combines paper arts, printmaking and book arts to make works that address human relationship to the environment. She teaches and lectures internationally including the 2015 Guild of Book Workers Standards Seminar, Kalamazoo Center for the Book, San Francisco Center for the Book, SAIC, Morgan Conservatory, Watermark Museum and Brauer Museum at Valparaiso University. She is a recent recipient of the 2016/17 Indiana Arts Council Grant.

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Jul
16
to Jul 29

Relief: Print Anywhere

PRINT 647 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $100

Relief printing can be done anywhere with minimal equipment and materials making it ideal (and safe) for the artist who wishes to pursue printmaking in a DIY framework. The newest generation of inks for relief can be used without solvents and other harmful materials. This two-week course will cover the basics of relief/block printmaking using a variety of materials including wood and linoleum, printed both by hand and with the assistance of a press. Individual exploration will be encouraged through one-on-one instruction and group critiques. A variety of approaches to image making may include found materials, multi-block and reduction color, chine colle, digital inkjet transfers and fabric printing. Collaboration will be encouraged.


Untitled, Woodcut/relief, 2015

Untitled, Woodcut/relief, 2015

Faculty

Danny Miller is an artist and musician living and working in Chicago, IL. Utilizing woodblock, lithographic printing and drawing, he conjures works inspired by science fiction pulp covers, Victorian engravings, advertisements, comic books and music. Miller has taught at Ohio State University, UW-Madison, SAIC and the Ox-Bow School of Art and has been the Printmedia Department Manager at SAIC for 28 years. He received his MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has worked in professional print shops including Landfall Press, Normal Editions Workshop and Four Brothers Press, in addition to playing and teaching traditional fiddle and banjo music at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago.

Search and Annoy, woodblock, screenprint, monotype, 16” x 22”, 2014

Search and Annoy, woodblock, screenprint, monotype, 16” x 22”, 2014

Oli Watt received his BFA from the University of Florida and his MFA from SAIC. He currently serves as Assistant Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where he teaches in the Printmedia Department. Oli has shown his work nationally and internationally including exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Spencer Brownstone Gallery in NYC, the Urban Institute of Contemporary Art in Grand Rapids, MI, La Band Art Gallery in Los Angeles and Rocket Gallery in London. His work has been discussed in numerous publications including Art on Paper, Art US, the New Art Examiner, Concrete Comedy and Contemporary American Printmakers. He currently runs free range, a studio and exhibition space on Chicago’s Northwest Side.

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Jul
16
to Jul 29

Materials and Processes: Woodfire

  • Ox-Bow, School of Art and Artists' Residency (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

CER 616 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $150

This multi-level ceramics course will incorporate wheel thrown and hand built vessels and objects to be fired in both a high temperature stoneware gas kiln and in Ox-Bow’s single chambered catenary style wood kiln that was built in 2005. The first part of the course will be making individual work and firing the gas kiln with the second part being a collaborative effort in loading, firing, and unloading the work in the wood kiln. Discussions, critiques, and slide lectures will be included.

 

Without Mincing Words / Sin pelos en la lengua, porcelain sculptures and terra cotta slip on walls, 9” x 6” x 7”, 2016

Without Mincing Words / Sin pelos en la lengua, porcelain sculptures and terra cotta slip on walls, 9” x 6” x 7”, 2016

Faculty

Salvador Jiménez-Flores is an interdisciplinary artist born and raised in Jalisco, México. Since coming to the United States, Jiménez-Flores has contributed to the Midwest art scene by producing a mixture of socially conscious installation, public, and studio-based art. He has presented his work at the National Museum of Mexican Art, Grand Rapids Art Museum, Urban Institute of Contemporary Art, and Casa de la Cultura in Jalisco, México amongst others. Recently, Jiménez-Flores was awarded a two year-long artist residency at the Harvard Ceramics Program, Office of the Arts at Harvard University and a nine months art residency with the city of Boston. He is also Resident Teaching Artist at Urbano Project and instructor at both Wheelock College, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and Harvard Ceramics Program, Office of the Arts at Harvard University. Jiménez-Flores received his MFA from Kendall College of Art and Design in Drawing and his BAS from Robert Morris University in Chicago.

Dinner Plate With Leaves, red stoneware, 1.5” x 9” x 9”, 2015

Dinner Plate With Leaves, red stoneware, 1.5” x 9” x 9”, 2015

Nathan Willever was raised in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He holds a BFA in Ceramics from Maine College of Art, in Portland, Maine. He worked as a journeyman production potter for five years after finishing school and has served as a technical assistant in ceramics at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts numerous times. He has taught multiple workshops on functional pottery around the region. Nathan is currently a full time studio potter living in Philadelphia.

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Jul
9
to Jul 15

Watercolor

PAINTING 606 001, 1 week, 1 credit

This course will focus on the materials and techniques of transparent watercolor. During the morning sessions, students will work from a studio still life and explore a variety of techniques and color schemes. Sessions will be individualized as much as possible to accommodate less experienced students. Afternoons will be devoted to a thematic suite of paintings developed over the course of the week.


False color image of density waves in Saturn's A ring, colored pencil and watercolor on paper, 44” x 57", 2015

False color image of density waves in Saturn's A ring, colored pencil and watercolor on paper, 44” x 57", 2015

Faculty

Carrie Gundersdorf is an artist based in Brooklyn, NY. She has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Julius Caesar Gallery, Shane Campbell Gallery and the Gahlberg Gallery at the College of DuPage. Her work has been in group exhibitions at Mills College Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art, Loyola Museum of Art, Gallery 400, Kavi Gupta Gallery, 106 Greene, Regina Rex, La Box, and Marc Foxx. Her work has been discussed in Art Review, Artforum.com, Artnet, Art on Paper, Bad at Sports, Chicago Tribune, and Time Out Chicago. Gundersdorf was the recipient of the Artadia Award and the Bingham Fellowship from the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. She has a BA from Connecticut College and an MFA from SAIC.

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Jul
9
to Jul 15

Monotype

PRINT 609 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $50

This course will present a variety of oil and water-based monotype techniques including chine colle, block printing, painted and photographic image transfers, and over-printing. Monotype is a versatile process incorporating chance and improvisation, and can be performed in the landscape as well as in the studio. Painters as well as printmakers will find this a dynamic new medium that is perfect for the home studio.


f3mme_arki+ecxturez (60% scale), screenprint and collage on paper in collaboration with Dan Luedtke, 3’ x 5’, 2012

f3mme_arki+ecxturez (60% scale), screenprint and collage on paper in collaboration with Dan Luedtke, 3’ x 5’, 2012

Faculty

Aay Preston-Myint is an artist, printmaker, and educator based in Chicago. His practice employs both visual and collaborative strategies to investigate memory and kinship, often within the specific context of queer community and history. In addition to his own work in interdisciplinary media, he is a founder of No Coast, an artist partnership that prints and distributes affordable contemporary artwork, serves as a DJ and organizer for Chances Dances, a party that supports and showcases the work of queer artists in Chicago, and is editor-in-chief of an online and print journal called Monsters and Dust. He holds an MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a BFA from SAIC, where he currently teaches.

 

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Jul
9
to Jul 15

Turning Objects into Narratives

SCULPT 656 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $50

For this course students will employ intuition and narrative as modes for creating a body of designed objects using mediums such as wood, plaster, and found objects. Through the study of artists and international designers alike including Chakaia Booker, Stephen Burks, Theaster Gates, and Alison Wade, students will consider how sculptural objects function, and facilitate conversation, and storytelling. Visiting local thrift stores, lumber yards, and sustainable outlets students will scavenge, find, and plunder materials. In class discussion and material gathering will be offset by shop demonstrations and construction methods. Sketches and small-scaled prototypes will lead up to the final presentations of both individual and collective projects.


Hutch, locally sourced ash wood, 60” x 34” x 24”, 2016

Hutch, locally sourced ash wood, 60” x 34” x 24”, 2016

Norman Teague is a Chicago based designer and educator who focuses on design projects and pedagogy that address the complexity of urbanism and the history of communities. Specializing in custom furniture delivering a personal touch for each client that adds unique aesthetic. Teague's past projects have included consumer products, fashion, public sculpture, performances, installations work, and specially designed retail spaces. He works mainly with common, locally-sourced building materials and found objects, working with local fabricators to create objects and spaces that explore simplicity, honesty and cleverness. In 2012, Teague worked with Theaster Gates on 12 Ballads for Huguenot House dOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, Germany, which enabled material transfer from a south side neighborhood to an abandoned building in Kassel. Additionally, he has served as lead craftsman and co-founder of the Design Apprenticeship Program at the University of Chicago's Arts Incubator and his partnered with Leaders1354, The Silver Room, The Exchange Cafe, Redmoon Theater and The Art Institute of Chicago. Teague holds a BA from Columbia College Chicago, and an MFA in Designed Objects from SAIC.

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Jul
2
to Jul 8

Pre-College Program: Landscape Drawing

DRAWING 407 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour (for-credit only)

Drawing upon the natural terrain of Ox-Bow, students explore drawing, design, composition and creativity. A wide variety of drawing materials are used. Slide lectures, critiques, and meetings with visiting artists are included each evening.

Note to parents/guardians: All Pre-College students are required to reside on campus during the course. Students are chaperoned and rules and regulations are strictly enforced. An adult chaperone is housed with Pre-College students throughout the week. Students must provide their own transportation to and from Ox-Bow. Pre-College students are not allowed to have vehicles on campus.


Pablo's Owl in Landscape, ink on paper, 33" x 26", 2012

Pablo's Owl in Landscape, ink on paper, 33" x 26", 2012

E.W. Ross is an artist based in Chicago. He has taught at SAIC, University of Chicago, University of Minnesota, Atlanta College of Art, Western Michigan University and the Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency. Previously, he served as the Program Director at Ox-Bow and the Dean of Continuing Studies at SAIC. He has had solo exhibitions at the Chicago Cultural Center; Cajarc, France; Phipps Center for the Arts, Hudson, WI; Chicago Firehouse and earned the Illinois Arts Council Individual Artist’s Fellowship; Chicago Council of Fine Arts; Alliance of Independent Colleges of Art Grant; School of the Art Institute Faculty Enrichment Grants; and IAC Governor’s International Arts Exchange Grant.

Blue, ink and gouache on paper, 52” x 144”, 2015

Blue, ink and gouache on paper, 52” x 144”, 2015

Olivia Petrides has exhibited in galleries and museums in Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Scotland, Seattle, Washington, D.C., and Chicago. Her works are in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution, the United States Park Service, the Field Museum, the Illinois State Museum, Openlands Preservation Association, and Iceland’s Hafnarborg Institute of Art, among others. She has received a Fulbright Grant, American-Scandinavian Foundation Grants, Margaret Phillips Klimek Fellowship, Chicago Community Arts Assistance Program grant, an Illinois Arts Council Governor’s International Exchange Award and an Illinois Arts Council Special Projects Award. She has been awarded residencies at the Reykjavik Municipal Museum and the Gil-society in Iceland, the Faroe Islands Museum of Natural History, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Vermont Studio Center, Catwalk, Yellowstone National Park, and the Ragdale Foundation. Petrides received her MFA from SAIC, where she is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Painting & Drawing Department and the Visual Communications Department.

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Jul
2
to Jul 15

Multi-Level Glassblowing

GLASS 602 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $300

An exploration into the ancient and modern techniques of mold-made blown glass for those with some glassblowing experience. Students will learn several techniques for making molds to form vessels or sculptural forms. A majority of time will be spent blowing glass and building molds along with lectures, demonstrations, and critiques to vary studio instruction.

 

Concentric Opaline, glass, 2015

Concentric Opaline, glass, 2015

Faculty

Emma Stein pursues her art with national shows and a Corning Museum of Glass Residency. She has taught at Buck's Rock Camp, CT, UrbanGlass, NY, John Michael Kohler Arts Center, WI, Ox-Bow, MI, and GlassRoots, NJ. She started blowing glass at the age of fourteen and has been passionate about the material ever since while also experimenting with numerous other media, such as fibers, drawing and plants. She draws inspiration primarily from the natural world with a focus on honeybees, natural patterning and invasive/endangered plant life. Emma started working with glass at Snow Farm Camp, Pilchuck, Corning Studios, and earned her BFA from Alfred University and her MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. She currently lives, works and teaches in New Jersey.

 

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Jul
2
to Jul 15

3D Animation, Virtual Environments

VIDEO 321 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours

3D animation is a versatile and fast growing industry used in applications from movies, video games, to virtual immersive environments. Students in this course learn how to create their own worlds by building three dimensional spaces, audio, interactivity, life forms, and/or objects using Maya software. Looking to artists who are utilizing 3D in contemporary and experimental ways such as Zeitguised, Eddo Stern, and Jennifer Steinkamp, students will research how this medium can be used in traditional and non-traditional ways. The course begins with introductory exercises to explore the possibilities in 3D animation, ultimately focusing on the skills necessary to complete individually-driven final projects. The course will emphasize 3D modeling, environment creating and their potential relationships to nature.


Solid, still image from 3D Animation, 4 mins, 2015

Solid, still image from 3D Animation, 4 mins, 2015

Faculty

Snow Yunxue Fu is an artist who lives and works in Chicago. Her artwork approaches the subject of the Sublime using topographical computer rendered animation installation. Fu teaches at SAIC in the Film, Video, New Media, and Animation and Continuing Studies Departments and in the Art Department at North Central College. She obtained her MFA from SAIC. Fu has exhibited her work nationally and internationally, including the Hong Kong Arts Center, ISEA2016 in Hong Kong, EXPO Chicago, Hongli Chen Art Museum, Ammerman Center for Arts and Technology in Connecticut, Digital Culture Center in Mexico City, Zhou B Art Center, Chicago Artist Coalition, Kunsthalle Detroit, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago Filmmakers, MoMA PopRally Screening, Gene Siskel Film Center, NURTUREart Gallery in Brooklyn, TEMP Art Space in New York, Gallery C Space in Beijing China, West Village Art Gallery in Chengdu China, SIMULTAN Festival in Romania, and 9:16 Film Festival in Australia.

 

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Jul
2
to Jul 15

House of Dust: Women in Flux(us)

ARTHI 624 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours

Intermedia by definition falls in-between established mediums (including the “media”). From this exterior-yet-pendant position, it has the critical potential of what the philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari dubbed the “minor.” The term intermedia was identified and theorized in 1965 by the Fluxus artist Dick Higgins to identify a current in experimental creative practices. In a gesture of historical recursion, we will examine projects and proposals by seven different contemporaries of that theorizing who adopted intermedia strategies in the late 1960s, six of whom are still practicing artists. We will be asking what they have done, how, why, and to what ends. All are women, some are friends, each has wisdom to share.


Judith Rodenbeck is an art historian and critic specializing in art and intermedia of the 1950s and 1960s; current research examines the multi-media work of key women artists in the 1960s and 1970s. Her book, Radical Prototypes: Allan Kaprow and the Invention of Happenings, was published by MIT Press in 2011. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Media & Cultural Studies at the University of California in Riverside.

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Jul
2
to Jul 8

Screenprinting: Marks, Stencils, & Exposures

PRINT 611 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $50

In this course, students will acquire technical proficiency in various hand and photographic stencil printing methods. Individual exploration and development in the medium will be encouraged and supported by individual instruction and group critiques. Emphasis will be placed on unique prints created by layering, stencil repositioning, and combining hand mark-making with photographic and found imagery. Collaboration will be encouraged.


Green River Observations 23. Screenprint monotype. 12.5in x 19in. 2015

Green River Observations 23. Screenprint monotype. 12.5in x 19in. 2015

Faculty

Steven Rainey is the exhibitions preparator at the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts in Grand Rapids, Michigan and is the co-owner/operator of Dinderbeck Studios, a community printshop and learning center. Steven completed his MFA in printmaking at Kendall College of Art and Design in 2014, he exhibits his work nationally and has participated in a variety of residencies that include The Frans Masereel Centrum in Kasterlee, Belgium and Cabin-Time in Green River, Utah.

 

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Jun
25
to Jul 1

Cut, Copy, Paste

PRINT 641 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $50

This experimental course offers students an opportunity to explore appropriation as a strategy for art making. Students will discuss and transform everyday printed matter and literature in the development of poetry and art works. A range of poetic forms will be introduced in relation to various printmaking techniques including: monoprint, pronto plate and transfer/copier methods. Magazines, books and other printed matter will serve as source material. This one week course is a workshop for different types of making which accesses the interconnectedness of image and language. Students will tap into the generative nature of studio practice cultivated from everyday resources.


Talk About Beautiful Things #1, ink on paper, 2013

Talk About Beautiful Things #1, ink on paper, 2013

Faculty

Ayanah Moor is an interdisciplinary artist whose creative tools include printmedia, performance, drawing and video. She has been awarded artist residencies at Hyde Park Art Center in Chicago; Proyecto ‘Ace in Buenos Aires, Argentina; Auckland Print Studio in New Zealand and the Vermont Studio Center. Moor’s work has been addressed in books like Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality and Blackness and What is Contemporary Art? published by University of Chicago Press. She completed her BFA at Virginia Commonwealth University and MFA at Tyler School of Art. Ayanah Moor is Associate Professor in Printmedia at SAIC.

We Wear the Mask III, collage on handmade paper 2014, Photo credit: Stephen Flemister

We Wear the Mask III, collage on handmade paper 2014, Photo credit: Stephen Flemister

Krista Franklin is an interdisciplinary artist whose work floats between the literary and the visual. Her practice engages a diverse range of artistic mediums from collage, hand papermaking, print, poetry and performance, installation, artist books and sound. She is the recipient of the Propeller Fund, and has held residencies at A Studio in the Woods, Cave Canem, and the University of Chicago’s Arts + Public Life Initiative. Her work has been published in Black Camera, Copper Nickel, Callaloo, Vinyl, BOMB Magazine, Encyclopedia, Vol. F-­‐K. Her chapbook of poems Study of Love & Black Body was published in 2012 (Willow Books).

 

 

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Jun
18
to Jun 24

Hot Projects: Experimental Glass Workshop

GLASS 643 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $150

In this course students will work with SAIC faculty and sculptor Christine Tarkowski and Firehouse Arts faculty and glass artist Pearl Dick. Students are introduced to the basic practice and principles of hot glass: hand blowing, mold blowing, cold working and sculpting within a highly experimental context. Emphasis is placed on harnessing the hot glass process to evolve and deliver unexpected outcomes and encourage transdisciplinary approaches. Students will work individually and participate in collaborative production teams to produce their experimental projects. Territories of production, conceptual and discipline inquiry will be considered relative to students' individual directions.

 

Faculty

From the Black Glass series, glass and steel, 2016

From the Black Glass series, glass and steel, 2016

Christine Tarkowski is a Chicago based artist who works in a variety of mediums including sculpture, printed matter, photography and song. Her works range in scale from the ordinary to the monumental. Equally variable is her scope of production, which incorporates the making of permanent architectural structures, cast models, textile yardage, and temporary printed ephemera. Many of her recent works point toward the flotsam of western culture relative to systems of democracy, religion and capitalism. Her work has been exhibited at Chicago Cultural Center, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, MASS MoCA, Manilow Sculpture Park, Socrates Sculpture Park, Renaissance Society, Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. She is the recipient of grants from the Driehaus Foundation, Creative Capital, Illinois Arts Council, Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media and is on faculty at SAIC. 

Comfort, blown, hot-sculpted glass, 18" x 10" x 9", 2016

Comfort, blown, hot-sculpted glass, 18" x 10" x 9", 2016

Pearl Dick is an artist, educator, and activist based in Chicago who specializes in glassblowing and sculpting, mixed media installation and oil paintings that address the relationships formed when lives intersect. Her work is featured in galleries and private collections around the country. Pearl is the founder of The Firehouse Glass Studio in Chicago, a community studio offering educational opportunities for youth and professional artists to create within a safe and supportive environment. As the Artistic Director for Chicago-based non-profit ArtReach, Pearl is committed to connecting under-resourced youth in Chicago with practicing artists in mentorship and youth development programs. In 2015, she co-founded Project FIRE, a youth program that combines glassblowing with trauma-informed psychotherapy for youth who have been victims of gun violence. Pearl is also the founder and co-owner of The Pack Animals, an art packing and handling business that specializes in the handling of fine art glass.

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Jun
18
to Jul 1

Communicating Through Form

CER 642 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $150

There are many psychological states and experiences that are best conveyed using images rather than words. In this course we will use ceramics to explore the history of image-based communication, from cave paintings to emojis. Each student will create personal symbols that convey emotions, ideas or mythologies that are difficult to communicate through written language, and will then use coil and slab construction to build a two foot sculpture of these symbols. Beginning students will quickly become accustomed to working large, and advanced students will be challenged to experiment and take risks with the material. The majority of class will be studio time interspersed with demonstrations, slide presentations and discussions. Topics of conversations will include abstraction versus representation, the roles of clay in contemporary art, and testing the limits of the ceramic medium.

 

Faculty

Blob with Arms, ceramic, 98” x 38” x 21.5”, 2015

Julia Haft-Candell grew up in Oakland, California, received a BA in art and international relations from UC Davis, and an MFA from CSU Long Beach. She currently lives and works in Los Angeles. She was the first Joan and David Lincoln Visiting Artist in Ceramics at Scripps College and Claremont Graduate University from 2012-2015. She recently attended the Skowhegan School for Painting and Sculpture in Maine, and teaches ceramics at USC and UCLA. She is represented by Parrasch Heijnen Gallery in Los Angeles.

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Jun
18
to Jul 1

Abstract Strategies

PAINTING 646 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours

Abstract Strategies is an interdisciplinary painting course where students will investigate ways artworks accrue meaning. The course will begin with an examination of shifting attitudes towards painting in the wake of Abstract Expressionism; with particular emphasis on the ways paint—a fluid and visceral substance—came to evoke the artist’s body. Students will consider the referential, performative and loaded connotations of their materials. From paint’s ability to index the movement of the artist’s body in the studio to its capacity for metaphor, students will learn that abstraction is far from empty; instead it is full of allusion and reference to the world outside itself.

In addition to material experimentation, this course will also involve a series of performative studio exercises designed to develop language to articulate both the “Why” and “How” of our individual studio practice. We will employ technical strategies of subtraction, repetition, collaborative naming, inversion and transparency as means to meld form, theory, and practice. Throughout all of this, we will return to the value of going astray, and what can be found there.


LONG GONE, acrylic and enamel on canvas, 20" x 16", 2016

LONG GONE, acrylic and enamel on canvas, 20" x 16", 2016

Faculty

E.E. Ikeler received a BFA from The Cooper Union and an MFA from Yale University. She’s had solo exhibitions at Kent Place Gallery in Summit, NJ, Jeff Bailey Gallery in Hudson, NY, and at the project space In Limbo, in Brooklyn, NY. Her work has been exhibited at Yve Yang Gallery in Boston, MA, Mulherin, New York and Abrons Art Center, New York. She received a Leroy Neiman Foundation Summer Fellowship at Ox-bow School of Art in 2016; a Yale FLAGS Award, a Helen Watson Winternitz Award and a Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library Research Fellowship (all Yale University, 2015). She is currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Painting at Indiana University.

Things I Like, silkscreen and marker on cardboard, 18” x 24”, 2014

Things I Like, silkscreen and marker on cardboard, 18” x 24”, 2014

Emmy Bright works with drawing, print and performance, inspired by ongoing research into pedagogy, psychology, comedy and art history. Recent exhibitions have been at David Klein Gallery in Detroit, MI; Ditch Projects in Springfield, OR; Yve Yang Gallery in Boston, MA; deCordova Museum and Sculpture Park in Lincoln, MA; and she has a project in Headmaster Magazine, No. 8. She received her MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art, an M.Ed from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a BA from University of Chicago. She has taught at the Rhode Island School of Design, City College New York, Bryant University and at the RISD Museum. She is currently living and working in Detroit where she is represented by David Klein Gallery.

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Jun
18
to Jun 24

Image and Word

PRINT 619 001, 1 week, 1 credit hour, Lab Fee $50

Students enrolled in Image and Word explore several woodcut, hand printing, typesetting and letterpress techniques. The class emphasizes the sequential and narrative properties of the relief printing process. Through presentations and critiques, the course of study examine how the physical qualities of the paper,image, text and binding can influence narration, pacing, rhythm, and meaning.The class also investigates the role of traditional printing in contemporary image making. Studio projects may include the creation and editioning of broadsides, sets of prints, or pamphlets.

 

Ilssa It’s About Time, installation, 2014

Ilssa It’s About Time, installation, 2014

Faculty

Bridget Elmer is an artist living in Saint Petersburg, Florida. She works as Coordinator of the Letterpress and Book Arts Center at Ringling College of Art and Design, where she also teaches. Bridget is the co-founder of Impractical Labor in Service of the Speculative Arts (ILSSA), co-owner of The Southern Letterpress, and founding member of Print St. Pete Community Letterpress. She received her MFA in the Book Arts from the University of Alabama and has taught at Penland School of Crafts, Florida State University, and Colorado College. Her work can be found in the collections of institutions including Yale University, Tate Britain, UCLA, and the Brooklyn Museum.

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Jun
18
to Jul 1

The Thinging Body

PERF 606 001/SCULPT 653 001, 2 weeks, 3 credit hours, Lab Fee $100

Contemporary artists often create works that employ the body as sculpture, or that look to prod the relationship between our bodies and the object world. Avant-garde social theories and advancements in technology in the 20th century spurred theories of objecthood and materiality in society—conversations that continue to shape contemporary discourse on identity politics, political theory and artistic production. This class will approach sculpture and performance practices through attention to various “thing theories,” object-oriented ontology, phenomenology, semiotics, and socio-economics to investigate the boundaries and overlaps in our conceptions of identity, thingness and culture.   


LYRIC, still from single channel video (6:39min) documentation of performance/installation, 2016

LYRIC, still from single channel video (6:39min) documentation of performance/installation, 2016

Faculty

Danny Giles combines a range of mediums and tactics to give form to political and metaphysical positions. His practice attempts to represent performative states of dispossession and to redress oppressive and exploitative systems. Giles received his BFA from SAIC and his MFA from Northwestern University. Giles attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and has held residencies at Mana Contemporary, High Concept Laboratories, Illinois State University and Sector 2337. Recent exhibitions include LYRIC at Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago and Vicinity at Shane Campbell Gallery, and Remembrancer at Sector 2337.

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